Peace for Our Time

Peace for Our Time
Munich to Dunkirk--the Inside Story

by Roger Parkinson

  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 1972
  • Pages : 411
  • ISBN : 9876543210XXX
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Munich; Peace for Our Time

Munich; Peace for Our Time
A Book

by Henri Nogueres,Henri Noguères

  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 1965
  • Pages : 423
  • ISBN : 9876543210XXX
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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"The Munich Agreement was a settlement permitting Nazi Germany's annexation of Czechoslovakia's areas along the country's borders mainly inhabited by German speakers, for which a new territorial designation "Sudetenland" was coined. The agreement was negotiated at a conference held in Munich, Germany, among the major powers of Europe without the presence of Czechoslovakia. Today, it is widely regarded as a failed act of appeasement toward Germany. The agreement was signed in the early hours of 30 September 1938 (but dated 29 September). The purpose of the conference was to discuss the future of the Sudetenland in the face of territorial demands made by Adolf Hitler. The agreement was signed by Germany, France, the United Kingdom, and Italy. Sudetenland was of immense strategic importance to Czechoslovakia, as most of its border defenses were situated there, and many of its banks and heavy industry was located there as well. Because the state of Czechoslovakia was not invited to the conference, it felt betrayed by the United Kingdom and France, so Czechs and Slovaks call the Munich Agreement the Munich Dictate (Czech: Mnichovský diktát; Slovak: Mníchovský diktát). The phrase Munich Betrayal (Czech: Mnichovská zrada; Slovak: Mníchovská zrada) is also used because the military alliance Czechoslovakia had with France and the United Kingdom was not honoured. Today the document is typically referred to simply as the Munich Pact (Mnichovská dohoda)."--Wikipedia.

השאלות והתשובות

השאלות והתשובות

by Anonim

  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 197?
  • Pages : 12
  • ISBN : 9876543210XXX
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The Munich Agreement of 1938

The Munich Agreement of 1938
The History of the Peace Pact That Failed to Prevent World War II

by Charles River Charles River Editors

  • Publisher : CreateSpace
  • Release : 2015-04-20
  • Pages : 56
  • ISBN : 9781511803946
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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*Includes pictures *Explains the appeasement of the Nazis in Czechoslovakia and Austria, and reactions to it *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents "My good friends," the mustached, bony man with thick eyebrows and large, strong teeth somewhat reminiscent of those of a horse, shouted to the crowds from the second-floor window of his house at 10 Downing Street, "this is the second time in our history, that there has come back to Downing Street from Germany peace with honor. I believe it is peace for our time." (McDonough, 1998, 70). The man addressing the crowd, British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain, had just returned from the heart of Nazi Germany following negotiations with Adolf Hitler, and the crowd gathered outside the English leader's house on September 30, 1938 greeted these ringing words with grateful cheers. The piece of paper Chamberlain flourished exultantly seemed to offer permanent amity and goodwill between democratic Britain and totalitarian Germany. In it, Britain agreed to allow Hitler's Third Reich to absorb the Sudeten regions of Czechoslovakia without interference from either England or France, and since high percentages of ethnic Germans - often more than 50% locally - inhabited these regions, Hitler's demand for this territory seemed somewhat reasonable to Chamberlain and his supporters. With Germany resurgent and rearmed after the disasters inflicted on it by the Treaty of Versailles following World War I, the pact - known as the Munich Agreement - held out hope of a quick end to German ambitions and the return of stable, normal international relations across Europe. Of course, the Munich agreement is now notorious because its promise proved barren within a very short period of time. Chamberlain's actions either failed to avert or actually hastened the very cataclysm he wished to avoid at all costs. The "Munich Agreement" of 1938 effectively signed away Czechoslovakia's independence to Hitler's hungry new Third Reich, and within two years, most of the world found itself plunged into a conflict which made a charnelhouse of Europe and left somewhere between 60-80 million people dead globally. Many people hailed Chamberlain's "success" at defusing Nazi aggression by handing over Czechoslovakia tamely to Hitler's control, but others remained dubious. Edouard Daladier, the French prime minister, "later told Amery that he turned up his coat collar to protect his face from rotten eggs when he arrived in Paris." (Gilbert, 1963, 179-180). A Foreign Office man, Orme Sargent, was disgusted, and he later said bitterly, "For all the fun and cheers, you might think they were celebrating a major victory over an enemy instead of merely the betrayal of a minor ally." (Gilbert, 1963, 180). Winston Churchill, the deal's most famous critic, bitterly remarked, "England has been offered a choice between war and shame. She has chosen shame, and will get war." Munich is widely reviled today and is held up as the epitome of appeasement, but historians still debate its effects on the Second World War, as well as Neville Chamberlain's character and motivations. Some believe the attempted appeasement of Nazi Germany hastened, or even caused, the mayhem occupying the next seven years. Others believe that the pact merely failed to alter war's inevitable arrival in either direction. Historians and authors alternately interpret Chamberlain as a bumbling, arrogant fool, a strong-willed statesman who simply miscalculated the nature of Hitler and Nazi Germany, or even a man with dictatorial ambitions surreptitiously inserting himself into the Fuhrer's orbit and prevented from further damaging democracy only by his fall and death from bowel cancer. Another possible interpretation, with considerable documentary support, asserts Chamberlain wished to enlist Germany's aid against the state most Europeans perceived as the true threat of the era, the Soviet Union."

The Munich Agreement of 1938

The Munich Agreement of 1938
The History of the Peace Pact That Failed to Prevent World War II

by Charles River Charles River Editors

  • Publisher : Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
  • Release : 2018-02-20
  • Pages : 96
  • ISBN : 9781985726857
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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*Includes pictures*Explains the appeasement of the Nazis in Czechoslovakia and Austria, and reactions to it*Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading*Includes a table of contents"My good friends," the mustached, bony man with thick eyebrows and large, strong teeth somewhat reminiscent of those of a horse, shouted to the crowds from the second-floor window of his house at 10 Downing Street, "this is the second time in our history, that there has come back to Downing Street from Germany peace with honor. I believe it is peace for our time." (McDonough, 1998, 70). The man addressing the crowd, British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain, had just returned from the heart of Nazi Germany following negotiations with Adolf Hitler, and the crowd gathered outside the English leader's house on September 30, 1938 greeted these ringing words with grateful cheers. The piece of paper Chamberlain flourished exultantly seemed to offer permanent amity and goodwill between democratic Britain and totalitarian Germany. In it, Britain agreed to allow Hitler's Third Reich to absorb the Sudeten regions of Czechoslovakia without interference from either England or France, and since high percentages of ethnic Germans - often more than 50% locally - inhabited these regions, Hitler's demand for this territory seemed somewhat reasonable to Chamberlain and his supporters. With Germany resurgent and rearmed after the disasters inflicted on it by the Treaty of Versailles following World War I, the pact - known as the Munich Agreement - held out hope of a quick end to German ambitions and the return of stable, normal international relations across Europe. Of course, the Munich agreement is now notorious because its promise proved barren within a very short period of time. Chamberlain's actions either failed to avert or actually hastened the very cataclysm he wished to avoid at all costs. The "Munich Agreement" of 1938 effectively signed away Czechoslovakia's independence to Hitler's hungry new Third Reich, and within two years, most of the world found itself plunged into a conflict which made a charnelhouse of Europe and left somewhere between 60-80 million people dead globally. Many people hailed Chamberlain's "success" at defusing Nazi aggression by handing over Czechoslovakia tamely to Hitler's control, but others remained dubious. �douard Daladier, the French prime minister, "later told Amery that he turned up his coat collar to protect his face from rotten eggs when he arrived in Paris." (Gilbert, 1963, 179-180). A Foreign Office man, Orme Sargent, was disgusted, and he later said bitterly, "For all the fun and cheers, you might think they were celebrating a major victory over an enemy instead of merely the betrayal of a minor ally." (Gilbert, 1963, 180). Winston Churchill, the deal's most famous critic, bitterly remarked, "England has been offered a choice between war and shame. She has chosen shame, and will get war."Munich is widely reviled today and is held up as the epitome of appeasement, but historians still debate its effects on the Second World War, as well as Neville Chamberlain's character and motivations. Some believe the attempted appeasement of Nazi Germany hastened, or even caused, the mayhem occupying the next seven years. Others believe that the pact merely failed to alter war's inevitable arrival in either direction. Historians and authors alternately interpret Chamberlain as a bumbling, arrogant fool, a strong-willed statesman who simply miscalculated the nature of Hitler and Nazi Germany, or even a man with dictatorial ambitions surreptitiously inserting himself into the Fuhrer's orbit and prevented from further damaging democracy only by his fall and death from bowel cancer. Another possible interpretation, with considerable documentary support, asserts Chamberlain wished to enlist Germany's aid against the state most Europeans perceived as the true threat of the era, the Soviet Union.

Munich: 1938

Munich: 1938
Appeasement Fails to Bring "peace for Our Time."

by Neil Grant

  • Publisher : Franklin Watts
  • Release : 1971-01-01
  • Pages : 81
  • ISBN : 9780531021545
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Traces the events leading to the 1938 Munich Conference and discusses the impact of the resulting agreement signed by the participating countries.

Sources of British History: Neville Chamberlain: Peace for Our Time

Sources of British History: Neville Chamberlain: Peace for Our Time
A Book

by Anonim

  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 2022
  • Pages : 129
  • ISBN : 9876543210XXX
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Britannia.com, LLC presents the text of "Peace for Our Time," a September 30, 1938 speech given by British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain (1869-1940). The speech was delivered following the signing of the Munich Pact, which was an attempt by Chamberlain to prevent or postpone a conflict with Germany.

The Bell of Treason

The Bell of Treason
The 1938 Munich Agreement in Czechoslovakia

by P.E. Caquet

  • Publisher : Profile Books
  • Release : 2018-08-23
  • Pages : 280
  • ISBN : 1782832874
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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On returning from Germany on 30 September 1938 after his agreement with Hitler on the carve-up of Czechoslovakia, Neville Chamberlain addressed the British crowds: 'My good friends... I believe it is peace for our time. We thank you from the bottom of our hearts. Go home and get a nice quiet sleep.' Winston Churchill commented: 'You have chosen dishonour and you will have war.' P.E. Caquet's history of the events leading to the Munich Agreement and its aftermath is told for the first time from the point of view of the peoples of Czechoslovakia. Basing his account on countless previously unexamined sources, including Czechoslovakian press, memoirs, private journals, military plans, parliamentary records, film and radio, Caquet presents one of the most shameful episodes in modern European history in a tragic new shape. Among its his most explosive revelations is the strength of the French and Czechoslovak forces before Munich. Germany's dominance turns out to have been an illusion. The case for appeasement never existed. The Czechoslovakian authorities were Cassandras in their own country, the only ones who could see Hitler's threat for what it was. In Caquet's devastating account, their doomed struggle against extinction and the complacency of their notional allies finally gets the memorial it deserves

Munich, 1938

Munich, 1938
Appeasement and World War II

by David Faber

  • Publisher : Simon and Schuster
  • Release : 2009-09-01
  • Pages : 528
  • ISBN : 1439149925
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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On September 30, 1938, British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain flew back to London from his meeting in Munich with German Chancellor Adolf Hitler. As he disembarked from the aircraft, he held aloft a piece of paper, which contained the promise that Britain and Germany would never go to war with one another again. He had returned bringing “Peace with honour—Peace for our time.” Drawing on a wealth of archival material, acclaimed historian David Faber delivers a sweeping reassessment of the extraordinary events of 1938, tracing the key incidents leading up to the Munich Conference and its immediate aftermath: Lord Halifax’s ill-fated meeting with Hitler; Chamberlain’s secret discussions with Mussolini; and the Berlin scandal that rocked Hitler’s regime. He takes us to Vienna, to the Sudentenland, and to Prague. In Berlin, we witness Hitler inexorably preparing for war, even in the face of opposition from his own generals; in London, we watch as Chamberlain makes one supreme effort after another to appease Hitler. Resonating with an insider’s feel for the political infighting Faber uncovers, Munich, 1938 transports us to the war rooms and bunkers, revealing the covert negotiations and scandals upon which the world’s fate would rest. It is modern history writing at its best.

Peace in Our Time

Peace in Our Time
After a Promise Made by Mr. Neville Chamberlain at Munich, 1939

by Anonim

  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 1940*
  • Pages : 72
  • ISBN : 9876543210XXX
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Munich

Munich

by APA Publications, Limited

  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 1998-10
  • Pages : 80
  • ISBN : 9789624218534
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Munich; Peace for Our Time. Translated From the French by Patrick O'Brian

Munich; Peace for Our Time. Translated From the French by Patrick O'Brian
A Book

by Henri Noguères

  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 1965
  • Pages : 423
  • ISBN : 9876543210XXX
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Munich

Munich
Nineteen Thirty-Eight Appeasement Fails to Bring Peace for Our Time

by Neil Grant

  • Publisher : Franklin Watts
  • Release : 1971-10-01
  • Pages : 129
  • ISBN : 9780531021545
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Munich

Munich
A Book

by Falk-Verlag AG

  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 2022
  • Pages : 129
  • ISBN : 9783884451281
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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"On 30 September 1938 the British Prime Minister, Neville Chamberlain, flew back to London, from his meeting at Munich with the German Chancellor, Adolf Hitler. As he paused on the aircraft steps, he held aloft the piece of paper which bore both his and the Fuhrer's signature, and which contained the promise that Britain and Germany would never go to war with one another again. That evening, from an upstairs window at 10 Downing Street, he told the ecstatic and thankful crowd that he had returned bringing 'Peace with honour - Peace for our time.'" "In this reappraisal of the events of seventy years ago, David Faber traces the key incidents leading up to the meeting at Munich, and its immediate aftermath. Drawing on a wealth of original archival material, Faber brings alive the events of 1938 and sheds new light on this extraordinary story. Full of narrative drive and vivid characters, Munich transports us around the capitals of Europe and is a piece of modern history writing at its best."--BOOK JACKET.

"Peace for Our Time"

'Peace for Our Time'
Mr. Chamberlain and Munich: the Truth about a Policy

by Allen Hutt,Gordon Schaffer,George Darling

  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 1938
  • Pages : 56
  • ISBN : 9876543210XXX
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Munich

Munich
A Book

by Hallwag Verlag GmbH

  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 1998
  • Pages : 129
  • ISBN : 9783828300811
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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"On 30 September 1938 the British Prime Minister, Neville Chamberlain, flew back to London, from his meeting at Munich with the German Chancellor, Adolf Hitler. As he paused on the aircraft steps, he held aloft the piece of paper which bore both his and the Fuhrer's signature, and which contained the promise that Britain and Germany would never go to war with one another again. That evening, from an upstairs window at 10 Downing Street, he told the ecstatic and thankful crowd that he had returned bringing 'Peace with honour - Peace for our time.'" "In this reappraisal of the events of seventy years ago, David Faber traces the key incidents leading up to the meeting at Munich, and its immediate aftermath. Drawing on a wealth of original archival material, Faber brings alive the events of 1938 and sheds new light on this extraordinary story. Full of narrative drive and vivid characters, Munich transports us around the capitals of Europe and is a piece of modern history writing at its best."--BOOK JACKET.

Munich

Munich
A Book

by Carolyn Donaldson

  • Publisher : HarperCollins
  • Release : 1991-01-01
  • Pages : 126
  • ISBN : 9780004357522
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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"On 30 September 1938 the British Prime Minister, Neville Chamberlain, flew back to London, from his meeting at Munich with the German Chancellor, Adolf Hitler. As he paused on the aircraft steps, he held aloft the piece of paper which bore both his and the Fuhrer's signature, and which contained the promise that Britain and Germany would never go to war with one another again. That evening, from an upstairs window at 10 Downing Street, he told the ecstatic and thankful crowd that he had returned bringing 'Peace with honour - Peace for our time.'" "In this reappraisal of the events of seventy years ago, David Faber traces the key incidents leading up to the meeting at Munich, and its immediate aftermath. Drawing on a wealth of original archival material, Faber brings alive the events of 1938 and sheds new light on this extraordinary story. Full of narrative drive and vivid characters, Munich transports us around the capitals of Europe and is a piece of modern history writing at its best."--BOOK JACKET.

In Our Time

In Our Time
The Chamberlain-Hitler Collusion

by Clement Leibovitz,Alvin Finkel

  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 1998
  • Pages : 319
  • ISBN : 9876543210XXX
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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When British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain returned from his Munich meetings with Adolf Hitler in September 1938, he proclaimed that he held in his hands a document guaranteeing "peace in our time." In the decades since, Chamberlain's folly has become the occasion for a commonplace historical lesson: that when the "good" innocently accept the assurances of the "evil," the result is catastrophic. Clement Leibovitz challenge the familiar understanding of Munich as the product of a naïve "appeasement" of Nazi appetites. They argue that it was the culmination of cynical collaboration between the Tory government and the Nazis in the 1930s. Based upon a careful reading of official and unofficial correspondence, conference notes, cabinet minute, and diaries, In Our Time documents the steps taken under diplomatic cover by the West to strike a bargain based upon shared anti-Soviet premises.

Peace for Our Time

Peace for Our Time
A Book

by Robert Rothschild

  • Publisher : Brassey's
  • Release : 1988
  • Pages : 366
  • ISBN : 9876543210XXX
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Surveys political and economic developments in Europe and the USA during the 1930s, based on official documents and historical sources, supplemented by the reminiscences of the author, a Belgian diplomat. Focuses on the failure of the Western powers to stand up to Nazi Germany and fascist Italy. Refers in passing to antisemitic elements in Nazi and fascist ideology in Germany, France, and other countries.

Neville Chamberlain

Neville Chamberlain
The Passionate Radical

by Walter Reid

  • Publisher : Birlinn Ltd
  • Release : 2021-09-02
  • Pages : 320
  • ISBN : 1788854829
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Neville Chamberlain is remembered today as Hitler's credulous dupe, the man who proclaimed in September 1938 that the Munich agreement guaranteed 'peace in our time'. Unjustly dismissed as one of the great losers of history, this is a magisterial reappraisal of the man and his legacy, showing him to be a true radical and a man of passion, particularly with regard to the welfare of his fellow citizens. As Minister of Health, Chancellor and Prime Minister, he presided over a fundamental modernisation of Britain, shutting the door on the Victorian age, ending Free Trade, improving living conditions and abolishing the Poor Law and the workhouse. Scarred by the death of his cousin in the First War, he was determined to ensure that another generation were spared the conflict that had engulfed their elders. Even so, he prepared for war while he worked for peace. The aircraft that won the Battle of Britain were built on his shift. He didn’t win the Second War, but he ensured it wasn't lost in 1940.