The Crisis of Kingship in Late Medieval Islam

The Crisis of Kingship in Late Medieval Islam
A Book

by Christopher Markiewicz

  • Publisher : Cambridge University Press
  • Release : 2019-08-31
  • Pages : 362
  • ISBN : 1108492142
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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In the early sixteenth century, the political landscape of West Asia was completely transformed: of the previous four major powers, only one - the Ottoman Empire - continued to exist. Ottoman survival was, in part, predicated on transition to a new mode of kingship, enabling its transformation from regional dynastic sultanate to empire of global stature. In this book, Christopher Markiewicz uses as a departure point the life and thought of Idris Bidlisi (1457-1520), one of the most dynamic scholars and statesmen of the period. Through this examination, he highlights the series of ideological and administrative crises in the fifteenth-century sultanates of Islamic lands that gave rise to this new conception of kingship and became the basis for sovereign authority not only within the Ottoman Empire but also across other Muslim empires in the early modern period.

Hierarchy and Egalitarianism in Islamic Thought

Hierarchy and Egalitarianism in Islamic Thought
A Book

by Louise Marlow

  • Publisher : Cambridge University Press
  • Release : 2002-05-16
  • Pages : 216
  • ISBN : 9780521894289
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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A wide-ranging 1997 study of Arabic and Persian literature, contrasting the egalitarian ideal of early Islam with the hierarchical impulses of the classical period.

The Persianate World

The Persianate World
The Frontiers of a Eurasian Lingua Franca

by Nile Green

  • Publisher : University of California Press
  • Release : 2019-04-09
  • Pages : 368
  • ISBN : 0520300920
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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At publication date, a free ebook version of this title will be available through Luminos, University of California Press’s Open Access publishing program. Visit www.luminosoa.org to learn more. Persian is one of the great lingua francas of world history. Yet despite its recognition as a shared language across the Islamic world and beyond, its scope, impact, and mechanisms remain underexplored. A world historical inquiry into pre-modern cosmopolitanism, The Persianate World traces the reach and limits of Persian as a Eurasian language in a comprehensive survey of its geographical, literary, and social frontiers. From Siberia to Southeast Asia, and between London and Beijing, this book shows how Persian gained, maintained, and finally surrendered its status to imperial and vernacular competitors. Fourteen essays trace Persian’s interactions with Bengali, Chinese, Turkic, Punjabi, and other languages to identify the forces that extended “Persographia,” the domain of written Persian. Spanning the ages expansion and contraction, The Persianate World offers a critical survey of both the supports and constraints of one of history’s key languages of global exchange.

Islam, Literature and Society in Mongol Anatolia

Islam, Literature and Society in Mongol Anatolia
A Book

by A. C. S. Peacock

  • Publisher : Cambridge University Press
  • Release : 2019-10-17
  • Pages : 310
  • ISBN : 1108499368
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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From a Christian, Greek- and Armenian-speaking land to a predominantly Muslim and Turkish speaking one, the Islamisation of medieval Anatolia would lay the groundwork for the emergence of the Ottoman Empire as a world power and ultimately the modern Republic of Turkey. Bringing together previously unpublished sources in Arabic, Persian and Turkish, Peacock offers a new understanding of the crucial but neglected period in Anatolian history, that of Mongol domination, between c. 1240 and 1380. This represents a decisive phase in the process of Islamisation, with the popularisation of Sufism and the development of new forms of literature to spread Islam. This book integrates the study of Anatolia with that of the broader Islamic world, shedding new light on this crucial turning point in the history of the Middle East.

Caliphate and Kingship in a Fifteenth-Century Literary History of Muslim Leadership and Pilgrimage

Caliphate and Kingship in a Fifteenth-Century Literary History of Muslim Leadership and Pilgrimage
al-Ḏahab al-Masbūk fī Ḏikr man Ḥağğa min al-Ḫulafāʾ wa-l-Mulūk

by Jo van Steenbergen

  • Publisher : BRILL
  • Release : 2016-11-07
  • Pages : 512
  • ISBN : 9004332367
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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In Caliphate and Kingship Jo Van Steenbergen presents a revisionist cultural biography, a critical edition and an annotated translation of al-Ḏahab al-Masbūk, a summary history of the ḥağğ and Muslim rule by Egypt’s leading historian al-Maqrīzī (d. 1442 CE).

The Saint of Jam

The Saint of Jam
History, Religion, and Politics of a Sunni Shrine in Shi'i Iran

by Shivan Mahendrarajah

  • Publisher : Cambridge University Press
  • Release : 2021-04-30
  • Pages : 250
  • ISBN : 110883969X
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Explores the emergence, florescence, decay, and rejuvenation of the Sunni saint cult and shrine-complex of Shaykh al-Islam Ahmad-i Jam over nine-hundred years.

The Persian Presence in the Islamic World

The Persian Presence in the Islamic World
A Book

by Richard G. Hovannisian,Georges Sabagh,Iḥsān Yāršātir

  • Publisher : Cambridge University Press
  • Release : 1998-11-19
  • Pages : 267
  • ISBN : 9780521591850
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The thirteenth volume based on the Giorgio Levi Della Vida conference reassesses the role of the Iranian peoples in the development and consolidation of Islamic civilization. In his key essay, Ehsan Yarshater casts fresh light on that role challenging the view that, after reaching a climax in Baghdad in the ninth century, Islamic culture entered a period of decline. In fact, he maintains, a new and remarkably creative phase began in Khurasan and Transoxania, symbolized by the adoption of Persian as a medium of literary expression. By the mid-sixteenth century, Persian literary and intellectual paradigms had spread from Anatolia to India, encompassing the greater part of the Islamic world. Yarshater also challenges traditional assumptions about the 'Islamization of Persia'. In the essays which follow, six distinguished scholars consider the historical, cultural, and religious aspects of the Persian presence in the Islamic world.

Caliphate Redefined

Caliphate Redefined
The Mystical Turn in Ottoman Political Thought

by Hüseyin Yılmaz

  • Publisher : Princeton University Press
  • Release : 2018-01-08
  • Pages : 370
  • ISBN : 0691174806
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The medieval theory of the caliphate, epitomized by the Abbasids (750–1258), was the construct of jurists who conceived it as a contractual leadership of the Muslim community in succession to the Prophet Muhammed’s political authority. In this book, Hüseyin Yılmaz traces how a new conception of the caliphate emerged under the Ottomans, who redefined the caliph as at once a ruler, a spiritual guide, and a lawmaker corresponding to the prophet’s three natures. Challenging conventional narratives that portray the Ottoman caliphate as a fading relic of medieval Islamic law, Yılmaz offers a novel interpretation of authority, sovereignty, and imperial ideology by examining how Ottoman political discourse led to the mystification of Muslim political ideals and redefined the caliphate. He illuminates how Ottoman Sufis reimagined the caliphate as a manifestation and extension of cosmic divine governance. The Ottoman Empire arose in Western Anatolia and the Balkans, where charismatic Sufi leaders were perceived to be God’s deputies on earth. Yılmaz traces how Ottoman rulers, in alliance with an increasingly powerful Sufi establishment, continuously refashioned and legitimated their rule through mystical imageries of authority, and how the caliphate itself reemerged as a moral paradigm that shaped early modern Muslim empires. A masterful work of scholarship, Caliphate Redefined is the first comprehensive study of premodern Ottoman political thought to offer an extensive analysis of a wealth of previously unstudied texts in Arabic, Persian, and Ottoman Turkish.

A Kingdom of Stargazers

A Kingdom of Stargazers
Astrology and Authority in the Late Medieval Crown of Aragon

by Michael A. Ryan

  • Publisher : Cornell University Press
  • Release : 2012-03-27
  • Pages : 232
  • ISBN : 0801463157
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Astrology in the Middle Ages was considered a branch of the magical arts, one informed by Jewish and Muslim scientific knowledge in Muslim Spain. As such it was deeply troubling to some Church authorities. Using the stars and planets to divine the future ran counter to the orthodox Christian notion that human beings have free will, and some clerical authorities argued that it almost certainly entailed the summoning of spiritual forces considered diabolical. We know that occult beliefs and practices became widespread in the later Middle Ages, but there is much about the phenomenon that we do not understand. For instance, how deeply did occult beliefs penetrate courtly culture and what exactly did those in positions of power hope to gain by interacting with the occult? In A Kingdom of Stargazers, Michael A. Ryan examines the interest in astrology in the Iberian kingdom of Aragon, where ideas about magic and the occult were deeply intertwined with notions of power, authority, and providence. Ryan focuses on the reigns of Pere III (1336–1387) and his sons Joan I (1387–1395) and Martí I (1395–1410). Pere and Joan spent lavish amounts of money on astrological writings, and astrologers held great sway within their courts. When Martí I took the throne, however, he was determined to purge Joan’s courtiers and return to religious orthodoxy. As Ryan shows, the appeal of astrology to those in power was clear: predicting the future through divination was a valuable tool for addressing the extraordinary problems—political, religious, demographic—plaguing Europe in the fourteenth century. Meanwhile, the kings' contemporaries within the noble, ecclesiastical, and mercantile elite had their own reasons for wanting to know what the future held, but their engagement with the occult was directly related to the amount of power and authority the monarch exhibited and applied. A Kingdom of Stargazers joins a growing body of scholarship that explores the mixing of religious and magical ideas in the late Middle Ages.

A History of Medieval Islam

A History of Medieval Islam
A Book

by John Joseph Saunders

  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Release : 2002-03-11
  • Pages : 240
  • ISBN : 1134930062
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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This is an introduction to the history of the Muslim East from the rise of Islam to the Mongol conquests. It explains and indicates the main trends of Islamic historical evolution during the Middle Ages, and will help the non-Orientalist to understand something of the relationship between Islam and Christendom in those centuries.

Persian Historiography across Empires

Persian Historiography across Empires
The Ottomans, Safavids, and Mughals

by Sholeh A. Quinn

  • Publisher : Cambridge University Press
  • Release : 2020-12-17
  • Pages : 250
  • ISBN : 1108842216
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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1. Introduction -- 2. Continuity and transformation : the Timurid historiographical legacy -- 3. Historiography and historians on the move : the significance of the number twelve -- 4. The first king of the world : Kayumars in universal history -- 5. Mirrors, memorials, and blended genres -- 6. Conclusion.

Trajectories of State Formation Across Fifteenth-century Islamic West-asia

Trajectories of State Formation Across Fifteenth-century Islamic West-asia
Eurasian Parallels, Connections and Divergences

by Jo Van Steenbergen

  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 2020-08-20
  • Pages : 329
  • ISBN : 9789004431300
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Constructed around seven extensively contextualized case studies, Trajectories of State Formation across Fifteenth-Century Islamic West-Asia offers a critical trans-dynastic understanding of the socio-political histories and historiographies of the Sultanates of Cairo and of the Timurid, Turkmen and early Ottoman

Caliphate Redefined

Caliphate Redefined
The Mystical Turn in Ottoman Political Thought

by Hüseyin Yılmaz

  • Publisher : Princeton University Press
  • Release : 2019-11-05
  • Pages : 384
  • ISBN : 069119713X
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The medieval theory of the caliphate, epitomized by the Abbasids (750–1258), was the construct of jurists who conceived it as a contractual leadership of the Muslim community in succession to the Prophet Muhammed’s political authority. In this book, Hüseyin Yılmaz traces how a new conception of the caliphate emerged under the Ottomans, who redefined the caliph as at once a ruler, a spiritual guide, and a lawmaker corresponding to the prophet’s three natures. Challenging conventional narratives that portray the Ottoman caliphate as a fading relic of medieval Islamic law, Yılmaz offers a novel interpretation of authority, sovereignty, and imperial ideology by examining how Ottoman political discourse led to the mystification of Muslim political ideals and redefined the caliphate. He illuminates how Ottoman Sufis reimagined the caliphate as a manifestation and extension of cosmic divine governance. The Ottoman Empire arose in Western Anatolia and the Balkans, where charismatic Sufi leaders were perceived to be God’s deputies on earth. Yılmaz traces how Ottoman rulers, in alliance with an increasingly powerful Sufi establishment, continuously refashioned and legitimated their rule through mystical imageries of authority, and how the caliphate itself reemerged as a moral paradigm that shaped early modern Muslim empires. A masterful work of scholarship, Caliphate Redefined is the first comprehensive study of premodern Ottoman political thought to offer an extensive analysis of a wealth of previously unstudied texts in Arabic, Persian, and Ottoman Turkish.

Muslim Sources on the Magyars in the Second Half of the 9th Century

Muslim Sources on the Magyars in the Second Half of the 9th Century
The Magyar Chapter of the Jayhānī Tradition

by Istvan Zimonyi

  • Publisher : BRILL
  • Release : 2015-10-12
  • Pages : 448
  • ISBN : 9004306110
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The Jayhānī tradition contains the most detailed description of the Hungarians in the 9th century. It is a reconstruction of the lost book from Arabic, Persian and Turkic copies. This study focuses on the historical interpretation of the Magyar chapter.

Turkey between Democracy and Authoritarianism

Turkey between Democracy and Authoritarianism
A Book

by Yeşim Arat,Şevket Pamuk

  • Publisher : Cambridge University Press
  • Release : 2019-08-31
  • Pages : 329
  • ISBN : 1108683088
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Since the 1980 military coup in Turkey, much of the history and politics of the country can be described as a struggle between democracy and authoritarianism. In this accessible account of the country's politics, society and economics, the authors delve into the causes and processes of what has been called a democratic 'backsliding'. In order to explore this, Yeşim Arat and Şevket Pamuk, two of Turkey's leading social scientists, focus on the mutual distrust between the secular and Islamist groups. They argue that the attempts by a secular coalition to circumscribe the Islamists in power had a boomerang effect. The Islamists struck back first in self-defence, then in pursuit of authoritarian power. With chapters on urbanization, Kurdish nationalism, women's movements, economic development and foreign relations, this book offers a comprehensive and lively examination of contemporary Turkey and its role on the global stage.

The Routledge History of Monarchy

The Routledge History of Monarchy
A Book

by Elena Woodacre,Lucinda H.S. Dean,Chris Jones,Zita Rohr,Russell Martin

  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Release : 2019-07-01
  • Pages : 736
  • ISBN : 1351787306
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The Routledge History of Monarchy draws together current research across the field of royal studies, providing a rich understanding of the history of monarchy from a variety of geographical, cultural and temporal contexts. Divided into four parts, this book presents a wide range of case studies relating to different aspects of monarchy throughout a variety of times and places, and uses these case studies to highlight different perspectives of monarchy and enhance understanding of rulership and sovereignty in terms of both concept and practice. Including case studies chosen by specialists in a diverse array of subjects, such as history, art, literature, and gender studies, it offers an extensive global and interdisciplinary approach to the history of monarchy, providing a thorough insight into the workings of monarchies within Europe and beyond, and comparing different cultural concepts of monarchy within a variety of frameworks, including social and religious contexts. Opening up the discussion of important questions surrounding fundamental issues of monarchy and rulership, The Routledge History of Monarchy is the ideal book for students and academics of royal studies, monarchy, or political history.

The Nature of Kingship C. 800-1300

The Nature of Kingship C. 800-1300
The Danish Incident

by Nils Hybel

  • Publisher : Northern World
  • Release : 2017-12-07
  • Pages : 390
  • ISBN : 9789004358348
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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In The Nature of Kingship c. 800-1300. The Danish Incident Nils Hybel presents the first comprehensive history of the changeable nature of monarchial power in Danish territories from the Viking Age to the Central Middle Ages. The work offers a pioneering methodological approach entirely based on medieval conceptions on sovereign power. This innovative approach involves contemporary ideas, not modern notions of power and kingship, being used to undertake the analysis. The Danish "Incident" is therefore integrated within the European context. Kingship experienced a profound transformation during the half millennium investigated. A royal genealogy and strong bonds with Christian institutions were established in the late eleventh century. In the middle of the twelfth century the Danish realm was united, followed by the final liberation from German hegemony and the expansion of the realm with German and Slavic fiefs in the late twelfth century. At the same time, with the first signs of taxation, legislation, law enforcement and the notion of a national, military force, kings began the transition from warlords to medieval kingship. With stirrings of constitutionalism from 1241 onwards, this development of a national, medieval, kingdom intensified, though by c. 1300 the kingdom had not yet reached the point of total sovereign power.

Afghanistan's Islam

Afghanistan's Islam
From Conversion to the Taliban

by Nile Green

  • Publisher : Univ of California Press
  • Release : 2016-12-12
  • Pages : 348
  • ISBN : 0520294130
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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"This book provides the first ever overview of the history and development of Islam in Afghanistan. It covers every era from the conversion of Afghanistan through the medieval and early modern periods to the present day. Based on primary sources in Arabic, Persian, Pashto, Urdu and Uzbek, its depth and scope of coverage is unrivalled by any existing publication on Afghanistan. As well as state-sponsored religion, the chapters cover such issues as the rise of Sufism, Sharia, women's religiosity, transnational Islamism and the Taliban. Islam has been one of the most influential social and political forces in Afghan history. Providing idioms and organizations for both anti-state and anti-foreign mobilization, Islam has proven to be a vital socio-political resource in modern Afghanistan. Even as it has been deployed as the national cement of a multi-ethnic 'Emirate' and then 'Islamic Republic,' Islam has been no less a destabilizing force in dividing Afghan society. Yet despite the universal scholarly recognition of the centrality of Islam to Afghan history, its developmental trajectories have received relatively little sustained attention outside monographs and essays devoted to particular moments or movements. To help develop a more comprehensive, comparative and developmental picture of Afghanistan's Islam from the eighth century to the present, this edited volume brings together specialists on different periods, regions and languages. Each chapter forms a case study 'snapshot' of the Islamic beliefs, practices, institutions and authorities of a particular time and place in Afghanistan"--Provided by publishe

The Power of Kings

The Power of Kings
Monarchy and Religion in Europe, 1589-1715

by Paul Kléber Monod

  • Publisher : Yale University Press
  • Release : 2001-08-11
  • Pages : 417
  • ISBN : 9780300090666
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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This sweeping book explores the profound shift in the way European kings and queens were regarded by their subjects between the Reformation and the Enlightenment. Once viewed as godlike beings, by 1715 monarchs had come to represent the human, visible side of the rational state. The author offers new insights into the relations between kings and their subjects and the interplay between monarchy and religion.

The Millennial Sovereign

The Millennial Sovereign
Sacred Kingship and Sainthood in Islam

by A. Azfar Moin

  • Publisher : Columbia University Press
  • Release : 2012-10-16
  • Pages : 368
  • ISBN : 0231504713
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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At the end of the sixteenth century and the turn of the first Islamic millennium, the powerful Mughal emperor Akbar declared himself the most sacred being on earth. The holiest of all saints and above the distinctions of religion, he styled himself as the messiah reborn. Yet the Mughal emperor was not alone in doing so. In this field-changing study, A. Azfar Moin explores why Muslim sovereigns in this period began to imitate the exalted nature of Sufi saints. Uncovering a startling yet widespread phenomenon, he shows how the charismatic pull of sainthood (wilayat)—rather than the draw of religious law (sharia) or holy war (jihad)—inspired a new style of sovereignty in Islam. A work of history richly informed by the anthropology of religion and art, The Millennial Sovereign traces how royal dynastic cults and shrine-centered Sufism came together in the imperial cultures of Timurid Central Asia, Safavid Iran, and Mughal India. By juxtaposing imperial chronicles, paintings, and architecture with theories of sainthood, apocalyptic treatises, and manuals on astrology and magic, Moin uncovers a pattern of Islamic politics shaped by Sufi and millennial motifs. He shows how alchemical symbols and astrological rituals enveloped the body of the monarch, casting him as both spiritual guide and material lord. Ultimately, Moin offers a striking new perspective on the history of Islam and the religious and political developments linking South Asia and Iran in early-modern times.