Download Empire of the Summer Moon Ebook PDF

Empire of the Summer Moon

Empire of the Summer Moon
Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History

by S.C. Gwynne

  • Publisher : Hachette UK
  • Release : 2011-07-07
  • Pages : 496
  • ISBN : 1849018200
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
GET BOOK

In the tradition of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, a stunningly vivid historical account of the forty-year battle between Comanche Indians and white settlers for control of the American West, centering on Quanah, the greatest Comanche chief of them all. Empire of the Summer Moon spans two astonishing stories. The first traces the rise and fall of the Comanches, the most powerful Indian tribe in American history. The second is the epic saga of the pioneer woman Cynthia Ann Parker and her mixed-blood son Quanah, who became the last and greatest chief of the Comanches. Although readers may be more familiar with the tribal names Apache and Sioux, it was in fact the legendary fighting ability of the Comanches that determined just how and when the American West opened up. Comanche boys became adept bareback riders by age six; full Comanche braves were considered the best horsemen who ever rode. They were so masterful at war and so skillful with their arrows and lances that they stopped the northern drive of colonial Spain from Mexico and halted the French expansion westward from Louisiana. White settlers arriving in Texas from the eastern United States were surprised to find the frontier being rolled backward by Comanches incensed by the invasion of their tribal lands. Against this backdrop Gwynne presents the compelling drama of Cynthia Ann Parker, a nine-year-old girl who was kidnapped by Comanches in 1836. She grew to love her captors and became infamous as the "White Squaw" who refused to return until her tragic capture by Texas Rangers in 1860. More famous still was her son Quanah, a warrior who was never defeated and whose guerrilla wars in the Texas Panhandle made him a legend. S. C. Gwynne's account of these events is meticulously researched, intellectually provocative, and, above all, thrillingly told.

Empire of the Summer Moon : Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History

Empire of the Summer Moon : Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History
A Book

by Anonim

  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 2013
  • Pages : 329
  • ISBN : 9876543210XXX
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
GET BOOK

Describes the actions of both whites and Comanches during a 40-year war over territory, in a story that begins with the kidnapping of a white girl, who grew up to marry a Comanche chief and have a son, Quanah, who became a great warrior.

Summary of S.C. Gwynne's Empire of the Summer Moon

Summary of S.C. Gwynne's Empire of the Summer Moon
A Book

by Milkyway Media

  • Publisher : Milkyway Media
  • Release : 2021-06-09
  • Pages : 329
  • ISBN : 9876543210XXX
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
GET BOOK

Buy now to get the key takeaways from S.C. Gwynne's Empire of the Summer Moon. Sample Key Takeaways: 1) October 3, 1871 marked the beginning of the end of the bloody Indian wars in America, which had been going on for 250 years since the first landing of the European settlers. 2) On that day, the US Army was ordered to kill the Comanche Indians in Texas, the last of the hostile tribes. The government sent in General Ranald Mackenzie, a Civil War veteran, to teach the other soldiers how to fight the Indians.

Empire of the Summer Moon

Empire of the Summer Moon
Empire of the Summer Moon GIFT JORNAL NETBOOK Cute Book

by Salih BOOK

  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 2020-03-28
  • Pages : 120
  • ISBN : 9876543210XXX
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
GET BOOK

prefect nice looking Summer Moon for pepole born Details: cover: matte finich size: 6*9 inche paper: whiet pages:120pages

Quicklet on S. C. Gwynne's Empire of the Summer Moon (CliffsNotes-like Book Summary)

Quicklet on S. C. Gwynne's Empire of the Summer Moon (CliffsNotes-like Book Summary)
A Book

by Fraser Sherman

  • Publisher : Hyperink Inc
  • Release : 2012-02-29
  • Pages : 24
  • ISBN : 1614641730
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
GET BOOK

ABOUT THE BOOK “It seemed implausible that the westward rush of Anglo-European civilization would stall in the prairies of central Texas.” – S.C. Gwynne, Empire of the Summer Moon S.C. Gwynne first became interested in the Comanches while reading Walter Prescott Webb’s The Great Plains. Webb mentioned in one chapter that the Comanche tribes had been a barrier to white settlement, something Gwynne, a northerner, had never heard of. Intrigued, he began reading more books about the tribe, such as T.R. Fehrenbach’s Comanche: The Destruction of a People. After moving to Texas in the 1990s, Gwynne discovered that the Lone Star State still remembered the Indian Wars. “A woman might tell me that her great-grandparents were both killed by Comanches,” Gwynne told the Historynet website. “This happened to me a lot.” (Interview with author S.C. Gwynne) Gwynne’s research convinced him there hadn’t been a significant book about the Comanches since Fehrenbach’s 1974 history. Having already written two nonfiction books, he decided to make the Comanches the subject of his third. He reasoned that if he found their history exciting and novel, other non-Texans, including New York editors, would have the same reaction. (Interview with author S. C. Gwynne) MEET THE AUTHOR Fraser Sherman was born in England and is now happily living in Durham, NC. He has 15 years experience as a reporter, 20 published fantasy/SF stories and is also the author of three film reference books. EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK They rejected conventional pitched battles in favor of the swift attacks the Comanche employed, and with this strategy won repeatedly. Over the next few decades, Texas forgot everything the Rangers had learned about Indian fighting. Texas and the United States fell back on traditional military tactics and peace negotiations. Negotiating with the Comanche never worked: the tribe’s warriors broke treaties and promises time and again, then came back and offered to renegotiate. By the 1860s, cholera, smallpox and other European diseases had crippled many Comanche tribes. Nevertheless, the remaining tribesmen remained formidable and their attacks actually pushed the frontier back east. Then, the United States government decided to give up on negotiations. In 1871 Army sent Col Ranald Mackenzie, a Civil War veteran, to lead cavalry into the plains and hunt down the remaining Comanche. Over the next four years, Quanah Parker’s Indian warriors and Mackenzie’s troops clashed repeatedly, with the cavalry ultimately gaining the upper hand. Parker surrendered in 1875 – the Comanches’ days as buffalo hunters and raiders were over. Parker adapted fast and well to civilization. Comanches had never cared for property, except horses, but Quanah Parker became a successful businessman and a prosperous landowner. Parker founded a school district for Comanche students. He also promoted the Peyote rituals that became the basis of the Native American Church. He died in 1911, of heart failure.... Buy a copy to keep reading!

Hymns of the Republic

Hymns of the Republic
The Story of the Final Year of the American Civil War

by S. C. Gwynne

  • Publisher : Scribner
  • Release : 2020-10-06
  • Pages : 416
  • ISBN : 1501116231
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
GET BOOK

From the New York Times bestselling and award-winning author of Empire of the Summer Moon and Rebel Yell comes “a masterwork of history” (Lawrence Wright, author of God Save Texas), the spellbinding, epic account of the last year of the Civil War. The fourth and final year of the Civil War offers one of the most compelling narratives and one of history’s great turning points. Now, Pulitzer Prize finalist S.C. Gwynne breathes new life into the epic battle between Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant; the advent of 180,000 black soldiers in the Union army; William Tecumseh Sherman’s March to the Sea; the rise of Clara Barton; the election of 1864 (which Lincoln nearly lost); the wild and violent guerrilla war in Missouri; and the dramatic final events of the war, including Lee’s surrender at Appomattox and the murder of Abraham Lincoln. “A must-read for Civil War enthusiasts” (Publishers Weekly), Hymns of the Republic offers many surprising angles and insights. Robert E. Lee, known as a great general and Southern hero, is presented here as a man dealing with frustration, failure, and loss. Ulysses S. Grant is known for his prowess as a field commander, but in the final year of the war he largely fails at that. His most amazing accomplishments actually began the moment he stopped fighting. William Tecumseh Sherman, Gwynne argues, was a lousy general, but probably the single most brilliant man in the war. We also meet a different Clara Barton, one of the greatest and most compelling characters, who redefined the idea of medical care in wartime. And proper attention is paid to the role played by large numbers of black union soldiers—most of them former slaves. Popular history at its best, Hymns of the Republic reveals the creation that arose from destruction in this “engrossing…riveting” (Kirkus Reviews, starred review) read.

Study Guide

Study Guide
Empire of the Summer Moon by S. C. Gwynne (SuperSummary)

by Supersummary

  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 2019-12-28
  • Pages : 76
  • ISBN : 9781652142362
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
GET BOOK

SuperSummary, a modern alternative to SparkNotes and CliffsNotes, offers high-quality study guides for challenging works of literature. This 75-page guide for "Empire of the Summer Moon" by S.C. Gwynne includes detailed chapter summaries and analysis covering 22 chapters, as well as several more in-depth sections of expert-written literary analysis. Featured content includes commentary on major characters, 25 important quotes, essay topics, and key themes like The Comanches, the Most Powerful Native American Tribe in American History and The Anti-Romantic "Noble Savage".

Selling Money

Selling Money
A Book

by Samuel C. Gwynne

  • Publisher : Grove Press
  • Release : 1986
  • Pages : 183
  • ISBN : 9781555840051
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
GET BOOK

The Perfect Pass

The Perfect Pass
American Genius and the Reinvention of Football

by S. C. Gwynne

  • Publisher : Simon and Schuster
  • Release : 2017-09-05
  • Pages : 304
  • ISBN : 1501116207
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
GET BOOK

An “excellent sports history” (Publishers Weekly) in the tradition of Michael Lewis’s Moneyball, award-winning historian S.C. Gwynne tells the incredible story of how two unknown coaches revolutionized American football at every level, from high school to the NFL. Hal Mumme spent fourteen mostly losing seasons coaching football before inventing a potent passing offense that would soon shock players, delight fans, and terrify opposing coaches. It all began at a tiny, overlooked college called Iowa Wesleyan, where Mumme was head coach and Mike Leach, a lawyer who had never played college football, was hired as his offensive line coach. In the cornfields of Iowa these two mad inventors, drawn together by a shared disregard for conventionalism and a love for Jimmy Buffett, began to engineer the purest, most extreme passing game in the 145-year history of football. Implementing their “Air Raid” offense, their teams—at Iowa Wesleyan and later at Valdosta State and the University of Kentucky—played blazingly fast—faster than any team ever had before, and they routinely beat teams with far more talented athletes. And Mumme and Leach did it all without even a playbook. “A superb treat for all gridiron fans” (Kirkus Reviews, starred review), The Perfect Pass S.C. Gwynne explores Mumme’s leading role in changing football from a run-dominated sport to a pass-dominated one, the game that tens of millions of Americans now watch every fall weekend. Whether you’re a casual or ravenous football fan, this is “a rousing tale of innovation” (Booklist), and “Gwynne’s book ably relates the story of that innovation and the successes of the man who devised it” (New York Journal of Books).

The Outlaw Bank

The Outlaw Bank
A Wild Ride Into the Secret Heart of BCCI

by Jonathan Beaty,S. C. Gwynne

  • Publisher : Beard Books
  • Release : 2004
  • Pages : 428
  • ISBN : 9781587981463
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
GET BOOK

From the two Time correspondents who cracked the story, the definitive book on the Bank of Credit and Commerce International: an explosive, fast-paced expose of one of the largest criminal conspiracies in history. Beaty and Gwynne's riveting first-person account not only puts all the pieces together for the first time, but brings to life the cloak-and-dagger intrigue that surrounded their investigation. 16 pages of photos.

Collection and Analysis of Pre-Evacuation Time Data Collected from Evacuation Trials Conducted in Library Facilities in Brazil

Collection and Analysis of Pre-Evacuation Time Data Collected from Evacuation Trials Conducted in Library Facilities in Brazil
A Book

by Rodrigo Machado Tavares,Steve Gwynne,E. R. Galea,University of Greenwich. Centre for Numerical Modelling and Process Analysis

  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 2007
  • Pages : 13
  • ISBN : 9781904521440
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
GET BOOK

Escape As a Social Response

Escape As a Social Response
A Book

by Steve Gwynne,University of Greenwich. Centre for Numerical Modelling and Process Analysis

  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 1997
  • Pages : 103
  • ISBN : 9781899991266
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
GET BOOK

Rebel Yell

Rebel Yell
The Violence, Passion, and Redemption of Stonewall Jackson

by S. C. Gwynne

  • Publisher : Simon and Schuster
  • Release : 2015-10-06
  • Pages : 688
  • ISBN : 1451673299
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
GET BOOK

An account of General Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson's rise to prominence during the Civil War.

The History of the Desloge Family in America

The History of the Desloge Family in America
A Book

by Christopher Desloge

  • Publisher : Lulu.com
  • Release : 2021
  • Pages : 329
  • ISBN : 1304244067
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
GET BOOK

Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher

Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher
The Epic Life and Immortal Photographs of Edward Curtis

by Timothy Egan

  • Publisher : Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Release : 2012-10-09
  • Pages : 352
  • ISBN : 0547840608
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
GET BOOK

“A vivid exploration of one man's lifelong obsession with an idea . . . Egan’s spirited biography might just bring [Curtis] the recognition that eluded him in life.” —Washington Post Edward Curtis was charismatic, handsome, a passionate mountaineer, and a famous portrait photographer, the Annie Leibovitz of his time. He moved in rarefied circles, a friend to presidents, vaudeville stars, leading thinkers. But when he was thirty-two years old, in 1900, he gave it all up to pursue his Great Idea: to capture on film the continent’s original inhabitants before the old ways disappeared. Curtis spent the next three decades documenting the stories and rituals of more than eighty North American tribes. It took tremendous perseverance—ten years alone to persuade the Hopi to allow him to observe their Snake Dance ceremony. And the undertaking changed him profoundly, from detached observer to outraged advocate. Curtis would amass more than 40,000 photographs and 10,000 audio recordings, and he is credited with making the first narrative documentary film. In the process, the charming rogue with the grade school education created the most definitive archive of the American Indian. “A darn good yarn. Egan is a muscular storyteller and his book is a rollicking page-turner with a colorfully drawn hero.” —San Francisco Chronicle “A riveting biography of an American original.” —Boston Globe

Hitler's Ostkrieg and the Indian Wars

Hitler's Ostkrieg and the Indian Wars
Comparing Genocide and Conquest

by Edward B. Westermann

  • Publisher : University of Oklahoma Press
  • Release : 2016-10-13
  • Pages : 336
  • ISBN : 0806157127
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
GET BOOK

As he prepared to wage his war of annihilation on the Eastern Front, Adolf Hitler repeatedly drew parallels between the Nazi quest for Lebensraum, or living space, in Eastern Europe and the United States’s westward expansion under the banner of Manifest Destiny. The peoples of Eastern Europe were, he said, his “redskins,” and for his colonial fantasy of a “German East” he claimed a historical precedent in the United States’s displacement and killing of the native population. Edward B. Westermann examines the validity, and value, of this claim in Hitler's Ostkrieg and the Indian Wars. The book takes an empirical approach that highlights areas of similarity and continuity, but also explores key distinctions and differences between these two national projects. The westward march of American empire and the Nazi conquest of the East offer clear parallels, not least that both cases fused a sense of national purpose with racial stereotypes that aided in the exclusion, expropriation, and killing of peoples. Westermann evaluates the philosophies of Manifest Destiny and Lebensraum that justified both conquests, the national and administrative policies that framed Nazi and U.S. governmental involvement in these efforts, the military strategies that supported each nation’s political goals, and the role of massacre and atrocity in both processes. Important differences emerge: a goal of annihilation versus one of assimilation and acculturation; a planned military campaign versus a confused strategy of pacification and punishment; large-scale atrocity as routine versus massacre as exception. Comparative history at its best, Westermann’s assessment of these two national projects provides crucial insights into not only their rhetoric and pronouncements but also the application of policy and ideology “on the ground.” His sophisticated and nuanced revelations of the similarities and dissimilarities between these two cases will inform further study of genocide, as well as our understanding of the Nazi conquest of the East and the American conquest of the West.

Progressive Country

Progressive Country
How the 1970s Transformed the Texan in Popular Culture

by Jason Mellard

  • Publisher : University of Texas Press
  • Release : 2013-10-01
  • Pages : 288
  • ISBN : 0292754671
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
GET BOOK

During the early 1970s, the nation’s turbulence was keenly reflected in Austin’s kaleidoscopic cultural movements, particularly in the city’s progressive country music scene. Capturing a pivotal chapter in American social history, Progressive Country maps the conflicted iconography of “the Texan” during the ’70s and its impact on the cultural politics of subsequent decades. This richly textured tour spans the notion of the “cosmic cowboy,” the intellectual history of University of Texas folklore and historiography programs, and the complicated political history of late-twentieth-century Texas. Jason Mellard analyzes the complex relationship between Anglo-Texan masculinity and regional and national identities, drawing on cultural studies, American studies, and political science to trace the implications and representations of the multi-faceted personas that shaped the face of powerful social justice movements. From the death of Lyndon Johnson to Willie Nelson’s picnics, from the United Farm Workers’ marches on Austin to the spectacle of Texas Chic on the streets of New York City, Texas mattered in these years not simply as a place, but as a repository of longstanding American myths and symbols at a historic moment in which that mythology was being deeply contested. Delivering a fresh take on the meaning and power of “the Texan” and its repercussions for American history, this detail-rich exploration reframes the implications of a populist moment that continues to inspire progressive change.

Spirits of Blood, Spirits of Breath

Spirits of Blood, Spirits of Breath
The Twinned Cosmos of Indigenous America

by Barbara Alice Mann

  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Release : 2016-01-06
  • Pages : 288
  • ISBN : 0199997209
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
GET BOOK

Before invasion, Turtle Island-or North America-was home to vibrant cultures that shared long-standing philosophical precepts. The most important and wide-spread of these was the view of reality as a collaborative binary known as the Twinned Cosmos of Blood and Breath. This binary system was built on the belief that neither half of the cosmos can exist without its twin. Both halves are, therefore, necessary and good. Western anthropologists typically shorthand the Twinned Cosmos as "Sky and Earth" but this erroneously saddles it with Christian baggage and, worse, imposes a hierarchy that puts sky quite literally above earth. None of this Western ideology legitimately applies to traditional Indigenous American thought, which is about equal cooperation and the continual recreation of reality. Spirits of Blood, Spirits of Breath examines traditional historical concepts of spirituality among North American Indians both at and, to the extent it can be determined, before contact. In doing so, Barbara Alice Mann rescues the authentically indigenous ideas from Western, and especially missionary, interpretations. In addition to early European source material, she uses Indian oral traditions, traced as much as possible to their earliest versions and sources, and Indian records, including pictographs, petroglyphs, bark books, and wampum. Moreover, Mann respects each Indigenous culture as a discrete unit, rather than generalizing them as is often done in Western anthropology. To this end, she collates material in accordance with actual historical, linguistic, and traditional linkages among the groups at hand, with traditions clearly identified by group and, where recorded, by speaker. In this way she provides specialists and non-specialists alike a window into the purportedly lost, and often caricatured, world of Indigenous American thought.

First Americans: A History of Native Peoples, Combined Volume

First Americans: A History of Native Peoples, Combined Volume
A History of Native Peoples, PowerPoints

by Kenneth Townsend

  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Release : 2018-12-07
  • Pages : 670
  • ISBN : 1351665189
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
GET BOOK

First Americans provides a comprehensive history of Native Americans from their earliest appearance in North America to the present, highlighting the complexity and diversity of their cultures and their experiences. Native voices permeate the text and shape its narrative, underlining the agency and vitality of Native peoples and cultures in the context of regional, continental, and global developments. This updated edition of First Americans continues to trace Native experiences through the Obama administration years and up to the present day. The book includes a variety of pedagogical tools including short biographical profiles, key review questions, a rich series of maps and illustrations, chapter chronologies, and recommendations for further reading. Lucid and readable yet rigorous in its coverage, First Americans remains the indispensable student introduction to Native American history.

This Is Your Mind on Plants

This Is Your Mind on Plants
A Book

by Michael Pollan

  • Publisher : Penguin
  • Release : 2021-07-06
  • Pages : 288
  • ISBN : 0593296915
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
GET BOOK

From #1 New York Times bestselling author Michael Pollan, a radical challenge to how we think about drugs, and an exploration into the powerful human attraction to psychoactive plants—and the equally powerful taboos. Of all the things humans rely on plants for—sustenance, beauty, medicine, fragrance, flavor, fiber—surely the most curious is our use of them to change consciousness: to stimulate or calm, fiddle with or completely alter, the qualities of our mental experience. Take coffee and tea: People around the world rely on caffeine to sharpen their minds. But we do not usually think of caffeine as a drug, or our daily use as an addiction, because it is legal and socially acceptable. So, then, what is a “drug”? And why, for example, is making tea from the leaves of a tea plant acceptable, but making tea from a seed head of an opium poppy a federal crime? In This Is Your Mind on Plants, Michael Pollan dives deep into three plant drugs—opium, caffeine, and mescaline—and throws the fundamental strangeness, and arbitrariness, of our thinking about them into sharp relief. Exploring and participating in the cultures that have grown up around these drugs while consuming (or, in the case of caffeine, trying not to consume) them, Pollan reckons with the powerful human attraction to psychoactive plants. Why do we go to such great lengths to seek these shifts in consciousness, and then why do we fence that universal desire with laws and customs and fraught feelings? In this unique blend of history, science, and memoir, as well as participatory journalism, Pollan examines and experiences these plants from several very different angles and contexts, and shines a fresh light on a subject that is all too often treated reductively—as a drug, whether licit or illicit. But that is one of the least interesting things you can say about these plants, Pollan shows, for when we take them into our bodies and let them change our minds, we are engaging with nature in one of the most profound ways we can. Based in part on an essay published almost twenty-five years ago, this groundbreaking and singular consideration of psychoactive plants, and our attraction to them through time, holds up a mirror to our fundamental human needs and aspirations, the operations of our minds, and our entanglement with the natural world.