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The Black Image in the New Deal

The Black Image in the New Deal
The Politics of FSA Photography

by Nicholas Natanson

  • Publisher : Univ. of Tennessee Press
  • Release : 1992
  • Pages : 305
  • ISBN : 9780870497247
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Between 1935 and 1942, photographers for the New Deal's Resettlement Administration-Farm Security Administration (FSA) captured in powerfully moving images the travail of the Great Depression and the ways of a people confronting radical social change. Those who speak of the special achievement of FSA photography usually have in mind such white icons as Dorothea Lange's Migrant Mother or Walker Evans's Alabama sharecroppers. But some six thousand printed images, a tenth of FSA's total, included black figures or their dwellings. At last, Nicholas Natanson reveals both the innovative treatment of African Americans in FSA photographs and the agency's highly problematic use of these images once they had been created. While mono-dimensional treatments of blacks were common in public and private photography of the period, such FSA photographers as Ben Shahn, Arthur Rothstein, and Jack Delano were well informed concerning racial problems and approached blacks in a manner that avoided stereotypes, right-wing as well as left-wing. In addition, rather than focusing exclusively on FSA-approved agency projects involving blacks - politically the safest course - they boldly addressed wider social and cultural themes. This study employs a variety of methodological tools to explore the political and administrative forces that worked against documentary coverage of particularly sensitive racial issues. Moreover, Natanson shows that those who drew on the FSA photo files for newspapers, magazines, books, and exhibitions often entirely omitted images of black people and their environment or used devices such as cropping and captioning to diminish the true range of the FSA photographers' vision.

New Deal Photography

New Deal Photography
USA 1935-1943

by Peter Walther,United States. Farm Security Administration

  • Publisher :
  • Release : 2016
  • Pages : 605
  • ISBN : 9783836537117
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Amid the ravages of the Great Depression, the United States Farm Security Administration (FSA) was first founded in 1935 to address the countryrsquo;s rural poverty. Its efforts focused on improving the lives of sharecroppers, tenants, and very poor landowning farmers, with resettlement and collectivization programs, as well as modernized farming methods. In a parallel documentation program, the FSA hired a number of photographers and writers to record the lives of the rural poor and ldquo;introduce America to Americans.rdquo; This book records the full reach of the FSA program from 1935 to 1943, honoring its vigor and commitment across subjects, states, and stylistic preferences. The photographs are arranged into four broad regional sections but are allowed to speak for themselves.

Picturing Migrants

Picturing Migrants
The Grapes of Wrath and New Deal Documentary Photography

by James R. Swensen

  • Publisher : University of Oklahoma Press
  • Release : 2015-10
  • Pages : 272
  • ISBN : 0806153164
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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As time passes, personal memories of the Great Depression die with those who lived through the desperate 1930s. In the absence of firsthand knowledge, John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath and the photographs produced for the New Deal’s Farm Security Administration (FSA) now provide most of the images that come to mind when we think of the 1930s. That novel and those photographs, as this book shows, share a history. Fully exploring this complex connection for the first time, Picturing Migrants offers new insight into Steinbeck’s novel and the FSA’s photography—and into the circumstances that have made them enduring icons of the Depression. Looking at the work of Dorothea Lange, Horace Bristol, Arthur Rothstein, and Russell Lee, it is easy to imagine that these images came straight out of the pages of The Grapes of Wrath. This should be no surprise, James R. Swensen tells us, because Steinbeck explicitly turned to photographs of the period to create his visceral narrative of hope and loss among Okie migrants in search of a better life in California. When the novel became an instant best seller upon its release in April 1939, some dismissed its imagery as pure fantasy. Lee knew better and traveled to Oklahoma for proof. The documentary pictures he produced are nothing short of a photographic illustration of the hard lives and desperate reality that Steinbeck so vividly portrayed. In Picturing Migrants, Swensen sets these lesser-known images alongside the more familiar work of Lange and others, giving us a clearer understanding of the FSA’s work to publicize the plight of the migrant in the wake of the novel and John Ford’s award-winning film adaptation. A new perspective on an era whose hardships and lessons resonate to this day, Picturing Migrants lets us see as never before how a novel and a series of documentary photographs have kept the Great Depression unforgettably real for generation after generation.

New Deal Photographs of West Virginia, 1934-1943

New Deal Photographs of West Virginia, 1934-1943

by Betty Rivard

  • Publisher :
  • Release : 2012
  • Pages : 231
  • ISBN : 9781933202884
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Upon entering the White House in 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt faced an ailing economy in the throes of the Great Depression and rushed to transform the country through recovery programs and legislative reform. By 1934, he began to send professional photographers to the state of West Virginia to document living conditions and the effects of his New Deal programs. The photographs from the Farm Security Administration Project not only introduced “America to Americans,” exposing a continued need for government intervention, but also captured powerful images of life in rural and small town America.New Deal Photographs of West Virginia, 1934-1943 presents images of the state's northern and southern coalfields, the subsistence homestead projects of Arthurdale, Eleanor, and Tygart Valley, and various communities from Charleston to Clarksburg and Parkersburg to Elkins. With over one hundred and fifty images by ten FSA photographers, including Walker Evans, Marion Post Wolcott, Arthur Rothstein, and Ben Shahn, this collection is a remarkable proclamation of hardship, hope, endurance, and, above all, community. These photographs provide a glimpse into the everyday lives of West Virginians during the Great Depression and beyond.

Official Images

Official Images
New Deal Photography

by N.A

  • Publisher :
  • Release : 1987
  • Pages : 196
  • ISBN :
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Hope in Hard Times

Hope in Hard Times
New Deal Photographs of Montana, 1936-1942

by Mary Murphy

  • Publisher : Montana Historical Society
  • Release : 2003
  • Pages : 242
  • ISBN : 9780917298813
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Arthur Rothstein, Russell Lee, John Vachon, and Marion Post Wolcott became some of the United States' best-known photographers through their pictures of Depression-era America. Their assignment, as one of their associates described it, was to have "a long look at the whole vast, complicated rural U.S. landscape with all that was built on it and all those who built and wrecked and worked in it and bore kids and dragged them up and played games and paraded and picnicked and suffered and died and were buried in it." In Montana the four photographers traveled to forty of the state's fifty-six counties, creating a rich record of the many facets of the Depression and recovery: rural and urban, agricultural and industrial, work and play, hard times and the promise of a brighter future. The photographers captured the dignity of Montanans as they struggled to scratch out livings from dried-up fields, nurture families in the shadows of Butte head frames, and foster communities on the vast expanses of the northern plains. Hope in Hard Times, features over 140 Farm Security Administration photographs to illustrate the story of the Great Depression in Montana and the experiences of the photographers who documented it. Today these striking images, from cities like Butte to small towns like Terry, present an unforgettable portrait of a little-studied period in the history of Montana. Selected from the Farm Security Administration Collection at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., the photographs in Hope in Hard Times offer viewers an unparalleled look at life in Montana in the years preceding the United States' entry into World War II.

The Bitter Years

The Bitter Years
The Farm Security Administration Photographs Through the Eyes of Edward Steichen

by Edward Steichen,Françoise Poos

  • Publisher :
  • Release : 2012
  • Pages : 288
  • ISBN : 9780500544181
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The Bitter Years was the title of a seminal exhibition held in 1962 at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, curated by Edward Steichen, and 2012 marks its 50th anniversary. The show featured 209 images by photographers who worked under the aegis of the US Farm Security Administration (FSA) in 193541 as part of Roosevelts New Deal. The Great Depression of the 1930s defined a generation in modern American history and was still a vivid memory in 1962. The FSA, set up to combat rural poverty, included an ambitious photography project that launched many photographic careers, most notably those of Walker Evans and Dorothea Lange. The exhibition featured their work as well as that of ten other FSA photographers, including Ben Shahn, Carl Mydans and Arthur Rothstein. Their images are among the most remarkable in documentary photography testimonies of a people in crisis, hit by the full force of economic turmoil and the effects of drought and dust storms. The Bitter Years celebrates some of the most iconic photographs of the 20th century and, since no proper catalogue was produced at the time, provides a whole new insight into Steichen's impact on the history of documentary photography."

The Woman Behind the New Deal

The Woman Behind the New Deal
The Life and Legacy of Frances Perkins, Social Security, Unemployment Insurance, and the Minimum Wage

by Kirstin Downey

  • Publisher : Anchor
  • Release : 2010
  • Pages : 458
  • ISBN : 1400078563
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Presents a portrait of the first female cabinet member and one of the most influential women of the twentieth century, whose efforts to improve the lives of America's working people resulted in such initiatives as unemployment insurance and Social Security.

Documenting America, 1935-1943

Documenting America, 1935-1943

by Lawrence W. Levine,Alan Trachtenberg

  • Publisher : Univ of California Press
  • Release : 1988-10-27
  • Pages : 361
  • ISBN : 9780520062214
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Gathers photographs by Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, Russell Lee and others, that everyday life in the U.S

New Deal Utopias

New Deal Utopias

by Natasha Egan

  • Publisher : Kehrer Verlag
  • Release : 2017
  • Pages : 175
  • ISBN : 9783868287905
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Photographs of three communities built during the Great Depression explore one of the most ambitious programs of Roosevelt's New Deal.

The Likes of Us

The Likes of Us
America in the Eyes of the Farm Security Administration

by Stuart Cohen

  • Publisher : David R. Godine Publisher
  • Release : 2009
  • Pages : 183
  • ISBN : 1567923402
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Featuring 175 duotone photographs, this book not only offers the chance to see a selection of famous and little-known images, but also to go behind the scenes of one of America's most original and creative government-sponsored projects.

Berkeley and the New Deal

Berkeley and the New Deal

by Harvey L. Smith

  • Publisher : Arcadia Publishing
  • Release : 2014
  • Pages : 127
  • ISBN : 146713239X
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Berkeley's 1930s and early 1940s New Deal structures and projects left a lasting legacy of utilitarian and beautiful infrastructure. These public buildings, schools, parks, and artworks helped shape the city and thus the lives of its residents; it is hard to imagine Berkeley without them. The artists and architects of these projects mention several themes: working for the community, responsibility, the importance of government support, collaboration, and creating a cultural renaissance. These New Deal projects, however, can be called "hidden history" because their legacies have been mostly ignored and forgotten. Comprehending the impact of the New Deal on one American city is only possible when viewed as a whole. Berkeley might have gotten a little more or a little less New Deal funding than other towns, but this time it wasn't "Bezerkeley" but very much typical and mainstream. More than history, this book shows the period's relevance to today's social, political, and economic realities. The times may again call for comprehensive public policy that reaches Main Street.

Photography and Politics in America

Photography and Politics in America
From the New Deal Into the Cold War

by Lili Corbus Bezner

  • Publisher :
  • Release : 1999
  • Pages : 307
  • ISBN :
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Although critics defended the trend, arguing that truly visionary art transcended politics, Bezner notes that the cold war era effectively silenced some of the most socially engaged photographers in American society."--BOOK JACKET.

Dorothea Lange, Documentary Photography, and Twentieth-Century America

Dorothea Lange, Documentary Photography, and Twentieth-Century America
Reinventing Self and Nation

by Carol Quirke

  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Release : 2019-03-07
  • Pages : 212
  • ISBN : 0429647972
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Dorothea Lange, Documentary Photography, and Twentieth-Century America charts the life of Dorothea Lange (1895–1965), whose life was radically altered by the Depression, and whose photography helped transform the nation. The book begins with her childhood in immigrant, metropolitan New York, shifting to her young adulthood as a New Woman who apprenticed herself to Manhattan’s top photographers, then established a career as portraitist to San Francisco’s elite. When the Great Depression shook America’s economy, Lange was profoundly affected. Leaving her studio, Lange confronted citizens’ anguish with her camera, documenting their economic and social plight. This move propelled her to international renown. This biography synthesizes recent New Deal scholarship and photographic history and probes the unique regional histories of the Pacific West, the Plains, and the South. Lange’s life illuminates critical transformations in the U.S., specifically women’s evolving social roles and the state’s growing capacity to support vulnerable citizens. The author utilizes the concept of "care work," the devalued nurturing of others, often considered women’s work, to analyze Lange’s photography and reassert its power to provoke social change. Lange’s portrayal of the Depression’s ravages is enmeshed in a deeply political project still debated today, of the nature of governmental responsibility toward citizens’ basic needs. Students and the general reader will find this a powerful and insightful introduction to Dorothea Lange, her work, and legacy. Dorothea Lange, Documentary Photography, and Twentieth-Century America makes a compelling case for the continuing political and social significance of Lange’s work, as she recorded persistent injustices such as poverty, labor exploitation, racism, and environmental degradation.

New Deal Art in Arizona

New Deal Art in Arizona

by Betsy Fahlman

  • Publisher : University of Arizona Press
  • Release : 2009-11-15
  • Pages : 203
  • ISBN : 9780816522927
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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ArizonaÕs art history is emblematic of the story of the modern West, and few periods in that history were more significant than the era of the New Deal. From Dorothea Lange and Ansel Adams to painters and muralists including Native American Gerald Nailor, the artists working in Arizona under New Deal programs were a notable group whose art served a distinctly public purpose. Their photography, paintings, and sculptures remain significant exemplars of federal art patronage and offer telling lessons positioned at the intersection of community history and culture. Art is a powerful instrument of historical record and cultural construction, and many of the issues captured by the Farm Security Administration photographers remain significant issues today: migratory labor, the economic volatility of the mining industry, tourism, and water usage. Art tells important stories, too, including the work of Japanese American photographer Toyo Miyatake in ArizonaÕs internment camps, murals by Native American artist Gerald Nailor for the Navajo Nation Council Chamber in Window Rock, and African American themes at Fort Huachuca. Illustrated with 100 black-andwhite photographs and covering a wide range of both media and themes, this fascinating and accessible volume reclaims a richly textured story of Arizona history with potent lessons for today.

Winning the Green New Deal

Winning the Green New Deal
Why We Must, How We Can

by Varshini Prakash,Guido Girgenti

  • Publisher : Simon and Schuster
  • Release : 2020-08-25
  • Pages : 384
  • ISBN : 1982142480
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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An urgent and definitive collection of essays from leaders and experts championing the Green New Deal—and a detailed playbook for how we can win it—including contributions by leading activists and progressive writers like Varshini Prakash, Rhiana Gunn-Wright, Bill McKibben, Rev William Barber II, and more. In October 2018, scientists warned that we have less than 12 years left to transform our economy away from fossil fuels, or face catastrophic climate change. At that moment, there was no plan in the US to decarbonize our economy that fast. Less than two years later, every major Democratic presidential candidate has embraced the vision of the Green New Deal—a rapid, vast transformation of our economy to avert climate catastrophe while securing economic and racial justice for all. What happened? A new generation of leaders confronted the political establishment in Washington DC with a simple message: the climate crisis is here, and the Green New Deal is our last, best hope for a livable future. Now comes the hard part: turning that vision into the law of the land. In Winning a Green New Deal, leading youth activists, journalists, and policymakers explain why we need a transformative agenda to avert climate catastrophe, and how our movement can organize to win. Featuring essays by Varshini Prakash, cofounder of Sunrise Movement; Rhiana Gunn-Wright, Green New Deal policy architect; Joseph Stiglitz, Nobel Prize–winning economist; Bill McKibben, internationally renowned environmentalist; Mary Kay Henry, the President of the Service Employees International Union, and others we’ll learn why the climate crisis cannot be solved unless we also confront inequality and racism, how movements can redefine what’s politically possible and overcome the opposition of fossil fuel billionaires, and how a Green New Deal will build a just and thriving economy for all of us. For anyone looking to understand the movement for a Green New Deal, and join the fight for a livable future, there is no resource as clear and practical as Winning the Green New Deal.

Women, Art and the New Deal

Women, Art and the New Deal

by Katherine H. Adams,Michael L. Keene

  • Publisher : McFarland
  • Release : 2015-12-21
  • Pages : 228
  • ISBN : 1476662975
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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In 1935, the United States Congress began employing large numbers of American artists through the Works Progress Administration--fiction writers, photographers, poster artists, dramatists, painters, sculptors, muralists, wood carvers, composers and choreographers, as well as journalists, historians and researchers. Secretary of Commerce and supervisor of the WPA Harry Hopkins hailed it a "renascence of the arts, if we can call it a rebirth when it has no precedent in our history." Women were eminently involved, creating a wide variety of art and craft, interweaving their own stories with those of other women whose lives might not otherwise have received attention. This book surveys the thousands of women artists who worked for the U.S. government, the historical and social worlds they described and the collaborative depiction of womanhood they created at a pivotal moment in American history.

名所江戸百景

名所江戸百景
Meisho Edo Hyakkei

by 安藤広重,Melanie Trede,Lorenz Bichler

  • Publisher : Taschen America Llc
  • Release : 2010
  • Pages : 272
  • ISBN : 9783836521208
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Hiroshige (1797-1858) was one of the last great artists in the "ukiyo-e" tradition. This complete reprint pairs each of the 120 large-scale illustrations with a description, allowing readers to plunge themselves into Hiroshige's beautifully vibrant landscapes of Edo (Tokyo).

Let Us Now Praise Famous Men

Let Us Now Praise Famous Men

by James Agee

  • Publisher :
  • Release : 1999-10
  • Pages : 471
  • ISBN : 9780720610840
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Agee's colleague at Time in the 1940s, John Hersey, writes a major evaluation of Agee's work and the Agee legend in a new introduction to this literary classic. 64 pages of photos.

Dorothea Lange: A Life Beyond Limits

Dorothea Lange: A Life Beyond Limits

by Linda Gordon

  • Publisher : W. W. Norton & Company
  • Release : 2010-10-11
  • Pages : 560
  • ISBN : 0393346374
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Winner of the 2010 Bancroft Prize and finalist for the 2009 Los Angeles Times Book Prize in Biography: The definitive biography of a heroic chronicler of America's Depression and one of the twentieth century's greatest photographers. We all know Dorothea Lange's iconic photos—the Migrant Mother holding her child, the shoeless children of the Dust Bowl—but now renowned American historian Linda Gordon brings them to three-dimensional life in this groundbreaking exploration of Lange's transformation into a documentarist. Using Lange's life to anchor a moving social history of twentieth-century America, Gordon masterfully re-creates bohemian San Francisco, the Depression, and the Japanese-American internment camps. Accompanied by more than one hundred images—many of them previously unseen and some formerly suppressed—Gordon has written a sparkling, fast-moving story that testifies to her status as one of the most gifted historians of our time. Finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize; a New York Times Notable Book; New Yorker's A Year's Reading; and San Francisco Chronicle Best Book.