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Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers
A Book

by Roger M. Slatt

  • Publisher : Newnes
  • Release : 2013-11-21
  • Pages : 688
  • ISBN : 0444563709
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Reservoir characterization as a discipline grew out of the recognition that more oil and gas could be extracted from reservoirs if the geology of the reservoir was understood. Prior to that awakening, reservoir development and production were the realm of the petroleum engineer. In fact, geologists of that time would have felt slighted if asked by corporate management to move from an exciting exploration assignment to a more mundane assignment working with an engineer to improve a reservoir’s performance. Slowly, reservoir characterization came into its own as a quantitative, multidisciplinary endeavor requiring a vast array of skills and knowledge sets. Perhaps the biggest attractor to becoming a reservoir geologist was the advent of fast computing, followed by visualization programs and theaters, all of which allow young geoscientists to practice their computing skills in a highly technical work environment. Also, the discipline grew in parallel with the evolution of data integration and the advent of asset teams in the petroleum industry. Finally, reservoir characterization flourished with the quantum improvements that have occurred in geophysical acquisition and processing techniques and that allow geophysicists to image internal reservoir complexities. Practical resource describing different types of sandstone and shale reservoirs Case histories of reservoir studies for easy comparison Applications of standard, new, and emerging technologies

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers
Chapter 1. Basic Principles and Applications of Reservoir Characterization

by Roger M. Slatt

  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 2013-11-21
  • Pages : 688
  • ISBN : 0128082674
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers
Chapter 5. Basics of Sequence Stratigraphy for Reservoir Characterization

by Roger M. Slatt

  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 2013-11-21
  • Pages : 688
  • ISBN : 0128082712
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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This chapter has summarized the concepts, techniques, and definitions of sequence stratigraphy. As in most subdivisions of geology, sequence stratigraphers have developed their own set of definitions and terminology, which have been outlined here for use in subsequent chapters. It is proposed that sequence stratigraphy form the basis for reservoir characterization, as will be expanded upon in subsequent chapters.

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers
Chapter 4. Tools and Techniques for Characterizing Oil and Gas Reservoirs

by Roger M. Slatt

  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 2013-11-21
  • Pages : 688
  • ISBN : 0128082704
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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There are many tools and techniques for characterizing oil and gas reservoirs. Seismic-reflection techniques include conventional 2D and 3D seismic, 4D time-lapse seismic, multicomponent seismic, crosswell seismic, seismic inversion, and seismic attribute analysis, all designed to enhance stratigraphy/structure detection, resolution, and characterization. These techniques are constantly being improved. Drilling and coring a well provides the “ground truth” for seismic interpretation. Rock formations are directly sampled by cuttings and by core and indirectly characterized with a variety of conventional and specialized well logs. To maximize characterization and optimize production, many of these tools as possible should be employed. It is often less expensive to utilize a wide variety of tools that directly image or measure reservoir properties at different scales than to drill one or two dry holes.

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers
Chapter 13. Geologic and Engineering Modeling

by Fuge Zou

  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 2013-11-21
  • Pages : 688
  • ISBN : 0128082798
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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In this chapter, the principles of reservoir modeling, workflows and their applications have been summarized. Reservoir modeling is a multi-disciplinary process that requires cooperation from geologists, geophysicists, reservoir engineers, petrophysics and financial individuals, working in a team setting. The best model is one that provides quantitative properties of the reservoir, though this is often difficult to achieve. There are three broad steps in the modeling process. The team needs to first evaluate the data quality, plan the proper modeling workflow, and understand the range of uncertainties of the reservoir. The second step is data preparation and interpretation, which can be a long, tedious, but essential process, which may include multiple iterations of quality control, interpretation, calibration and tests. The third step is determining whether to build a deterministic (single, data-based model) or stochastic (multiple geostatistical iterations) model. The modeling approach may be decided by the quality and quantity of the data. There is no single rule of thumb because no two reservoirs are identical. Object-based stochastic modeling is the most widely used modeling method today. The modeling results need to be constrained and refined by both geologic and mathematical validation. Variogram analysis is very important in quality control of object-based stochastic modeling. Outcrops are excellent sources of continuous data which can be incorporated into subsurface reservoir modeling either by 1) building an outcrop “reservoir” model, or 2) identifying and developing outcrop analogs of subsurface reservoirs. Significant upscaling of a reservoir model for flow simulation may well result in an erroneous history match because the upscaling process often deletes lateral and vertical heterogeneities which may control or affect reservoir performance, particularly in a deterministic model. Reservoir uncertainties are easier to manipulate by object-based stochastic models. Choosing the best realization approach for the reservoir model is the key to predicting reservoir performance in the management of reservoirs.

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers
Chapter 8. Eolian (Windblown) Deposits and Reservoirs

by Roger M. Slatt

  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 2013-11-21
  • Pages : 688
  • ISBN : 0128082747
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The focus of this chapter has been on eolian reservoirs, with only a secondary emphasis on description of outcrops. That is because the unique, fine-scale stratification characteristics of eolian deposits that affect their reservoir performance have been very well documented from the reservoirs themselves. Because of the likelihood of stratigraphic compartmentalization and permeability anisotropy resulting from bounding surfaces, it is very important that eolian reservoirs be characterized in detail. In addition to the effects of bounding surfaces, variations in cementation within laminae of different grain sizes result in small-scale variations in porosity and permeability, which are difficult and expensive to measure and document. This fact further emphasizes the importance of detailed reservoir characterization.

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers
Chapter 12. Unconventional Resource Shales

by Roger M. Slatt

  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 2013-11-21
  • Pages : 688
  • ISBN : 012808278X
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Certain parts of this chapter have been taken directly from the publication Important geological properties of unconventional resource shales, by Roger M. Slatt, published in the fourth-quarter issue of the Central European Journal of Geosciences (2011). The journal’s permission to reproduce those parts of that paper here is gratefully acknowledged.

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers
Chapter 9. Deltaic Deposits and Reservoirs

by Roger M. Slatt

  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 2013-11-21
  • Pages : 688
  • ISBN : 0128082755
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Globally, deltas often contain major oil and gas reservoirs. The geometry, size, and internal architecture of deltas are functions of many variables related to the delta's mode of formation. A tripartite classification of deltas, into river-, wave-, and tide-dominated deltas, has been a standard for many years. However, even within each of these delta types, the distribution of properties can vary considerably depending on the delta’s depositional history and the relative influence of rivers, waves, and tides. With regard to reservoir performance and optimization, perhaps the most significant difference in delta properties is in orientation and continuity of sand (reservoir) and shale (barrier) trends. Reservoir quality also varies according to the facies within the delta. To maximize hydrocarbon production, it is not sufficient to merely classify the reservoir as a delta. A complete understanding of the characteristics and variations of an individual delta’s reservoir is required for proper well placement and reservoir management.

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers
Chapter 10. Nondeltaic, Shallow Marine Deposits and Reservoirs

by Roger M. Slatt

  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 2013-11-21
  • Pages : 688
  • ISBN : 0128082763
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Shallow marine environments, from the shoreline to the shelf edge, are complex and result in complex deposits. In turn, complex deposits translate into complex reservoirs. To maximize reservoir performance, it is imperative that we understand the type of shallow marine deposit that makes up the reservoir. That is not an easy task, as is exemplified by the various interpretations that have been assigned to linear sandstones of the U.S. Cretaceous Western Interior Seaway. These sandstones, in both outcrop and subsurface reservoirs, have been interpreted to be offshore shelf bars or ridges, shoreface bodies, and incised valley fill. Interpreting the type of deposit is not merely an academic exercise, it is essential because each of these different types of sandstone bodies is characterized by different geometries and degrees of compartmentalization. There are numerous examples of shoreface deposits that are truncated by younger incised valley fill. Subtle variations in gamma-ray log response can be used to identify such strata. Barrier-island deposits provide a particularly challenging reservoir characterization problem. Because of the variety of sedimentary processes that can influence barrier-island formation, several different sandstone and shale geometries and trends can occur. That variation in geometries can lead to the potential for a high degree of compartmentalization that is difficult to predict. Again, depositional-geometry prediction and well placement are facilitated by an understanding of the nature of the deposit and how it was formed.

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers
Chapter 3. Geologic Time and Stratigraphy

by Roger M. Slatt

  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 2013-11-21
  • Pages : 688
  • ISBN : 0128082690
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The concept of long periods of time being required for reservoirs to assume their present form is difficult to grasp, particularly for those individuals who track daily oil and gas production from reservoirs. However, the lengthy formative processes for hydrocarbon reservoirs can be understood, and this understanding is important for proper knowledge of why a reservoir is configured the way it is. The geologic time scale is divided into a series of time intervals that are based on significant events in the geologic record. Various temporal names applied to rock units commonly are used and must be recognized by people studying reservoirs. For a simple example, a Cretaceous reservoir rock was not deposited at the same time as a Devonian reservoir rock. The time during which a rock formed is dated by two means: absolute dating and relative dating. Absolute dating refers to the analysis of radioactive components in a mineral (within a rock), which provides the age at which the mineral formed (solidified) in the rock. Such techniques are used mainly for igneous rocks that cool directly from magma, but some chemically precipitated minerals and cements in sedimentary rocks can be dated in this manner. More common to the study of sedimentary rocks is relative age dating, where the age of a particular rock is determined relative to its position within a stratigraphic succession. If sedimentary rocks are crosscut by datable igneous rocks, sometimes the absolute age range of deposition of the sedimentary rock can be determined. An analysis of microorganisms in sediments and sedimentary rocks can provide a useful means of establishing rock zonations (biozones) and sometimes for determining absolute age. Micropaleontology, biostratigraphy, and palynology are critical disciplines in the petroleum industry, for exploration and for reservoir characterization. In addition to providing a means for absolute dating of sedimentary rocks, high-resolution biostratigraphy and palynology can aid in (1) interpreting stratigraphic intervals and their ages on seismic reflection profiles, (2) correlating between-well stratigraphic and temporal relationships, (3) determining sedimentation rates, and (4) determining depositional environments and changes in environments over time. Walther’s law of succession of sedimentary facies is key to understanding the origin of sedimentary deposits and reservoirs. It is a fundamental principle that is the backbone of stratigraphy. Stratigraphic sequences, such as those that comprise reservoirs, exhibit systematic and somewhat predictable vertical stacking patterns that are explained by Walther’s law. By understanding the vertical stratigraphy of a reservoir, one can make improved interpretations of the lateral (dis)continuity of reservoir intervals.

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers
Chapter 11. Deepwater Deposits and Reservoirs

by Roger M. Slatt

  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 2013-11-21
  • Pages : 688
  • ISBN : 0128082771
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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This chapter has summarized the important characteristics of deepwater deposits and reservoirs. These reservoirs are quite complex and variable. An understanding of the different architectural elements and their interrelations is critical to hydrocarbon recovery, because the elements exhibit different external geometries, sizes, spatial orientations, and internal sedimentary and stratigraphic features. Because of these differences, the volume of hydrocarbons and the anticipated recovery efficiency will vary by architectural element (). There are many new and awaiting opportunities for deepwater reservoirs both onshore and offshore. The US Gulf of Mexico and many other parts of the world are hot spots or emerging areas for exploration and development of vast resources of oil and gas (Fig. 11.93).

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers
Chapter 2. Basic Sedimentary Rock Properties

by Roger M. Slatt

  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 2013-11-21
  • Pages : 688
  • ISBN : 0128082682
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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In summary, physical, biogenic, and chemical sedimentary structures are important to many aspects of reservoir characterization and should be included in every characterization, whether the analyst is using cores, borehole-image logs, or an analog outcrop. Sedimentary structures provide important information about the depositional environment of the reservoir rock, and from that information, one can determine the extent and geometry of the reservoir, its trend, and any likely impediments to hydrocarbon production. Porosity and permeability and, in particular, fluid-flow paths are also affected and guided by how the sediment grains are arranged into specific structures. Finally, one should bear in mind that some sedimentary structures can produce misleading or erroneous well-log results.

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers

Stratigraphic Reservoir Characterization for Petroleum Geologists, Geophysicists, and Engineers
Chapter 7. Fluvial Deposits and Reservoirs

by Roger M. Slatt

  • Publisher : Elsevier Inc. Chapters
  • Release : 2013-11-21
  • Pages : 688
  • ISBN : 0128082739
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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There are different types of fluvial deposits and reservoirs. The two end-member depositional types are braided-river and fluvial-river deposits. A third type, incised valley fill, can contain either or both of these end members within the confines of the valley. In addition, fluvial deposits near the mouths of the valleys may become reworked by estuarine and tidal processes, which ultimately produce a different set of reservoir properties. The geometry, size, and reservoir characteristics of each fluvial type depend upon transportational, depositional, and postdepositional (diagenetic) processes that are controlled by several external variables, including geographic location, sediment source areas (provenance), climate, and degree of tectonic activity. Braided-river deposits tend to be relatively coarse-grained and consist of gravel and sand, with little to no mud. Because of this, the beds tend to be laterally continuous over much or all of the width of the braidplain, although the presence of some shale beds may disrupt the continuity locally. By contrast, meandering-river deposits tend to be finer-grained, more lenticular, and partially or completely encased in floodplain shales. Depending upon the deposit's degree and type of postdepositional compaction and cementation, its porosity and permeability can be quite variable. However, in general, braided-river facies are more porous and more permeable than are meandering-river facies. A typical sequence stratigraphic stacking pattern for fluvial deposits consists of a basal erosion surface, formed during a falling stage of relative sea level, upon which sits, from the base upward, a lower braided-river deposit (deposited during early turnaround in relative sea level), a floodplain–meandering-river system, and then lacustrine and/or estuarine/floodplain deposits of a transgressive systems tract, capped by highstand floodplain/meandering-river deposits. As a result of differences in properties, fluvial reservoirs can be expected to have quite varied performances. Any reservoir-management plan should include an evaluation of the type of fluvial reservoir and its characteristics. For example, waterflood sweep efficiency will be higher in a braided-river reservoir than in a meandering-river reservoir. Also, horizontal wells may be more efficient in a set of discontinuous meandering-river sandstones than in a more continuous and interconnected set of braided-river deposits. Seismic-reflection techniques, as well as well-log, core, and well-test analyses, all can be used to adequately define the type of fluvial reservoir and predict the recovery performance and efficiency of that reservoir.

The Practice of Reservoir Engineering

The Practice of Reservoir Engineering
A Book

by L. P. Dake

  • Publisher : Elsevier
  • Release : 2001
  • Pages : 546
  • ISBN : 0444506713
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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This revised edition of the bestselling Practice of Reservoir Engineering has been written for those in the oil industry requiring a working knowledge of how the complex subject of hydrocarbon reservoir engineering can be applied in the field in a practical manner. Containing additions and corrections to the first edition, the book is a simple statement of how to do the job and is particularly suitable for reservoir/production engineers as well as those associated with hydrocarbon recovery. This practical book approaches the basic limitations of reservoir engineering with the basic tenet of science: Occam's Razor, which applies to reservoir engineering to a greater extent than for most physical sciences - if there are two ways to account for a physical phenomenon, it is the simpler that is the more useful. Therefore, simplicity is the theme of this volume. Reservoir and production engineers, geoscientists, petrophysicists, and those involved in the management of oil and gas fields will want this edition.

Elements of Petroleum Geology

Elements of Petroleum Geology
A Book

by Richard C. Selley,Stephen A. Sonnenberg

  • Publisher : Academic Press
  • Release : 2014-11-08
  • Pages : 526
  • ISBN : 0123860326
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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This Third Edition of Elements of Petroleum Geology is completely updated and revised to reflect the vast changes in the field since publication of the Second Edition. This book is a usefulprimer for geophysicists, geologists, and petroleum engineers in the oil industry who wish to expand their knowledge beyond their specialized area. It is also an excellent introductory text for a university course in petroleum geoscience. Elements of Petroleum Geology begins with an account of the physical and chemical properties of petroleum, reviewing methods of petroleum exploration and production. These methods include drilling, geophysical exploration techniques, wireline logging, and subsurface geological mapping. After describing the temperatures and pressures of the subsurface environment and the hydrodynamics of connate fluids, Selley examines the generation and migration of petroleum, reservoir rocks and trapping mechanisms, and the habit of petroleum in sedimentary basins. The book contains an account of the composition and formation of tar sands and oil shales, and concludes with a brief review of prospect risk analysis, reserve estimation, and other economic topics. Updates the Second Edition completely Reviews the concepts and methodology of petroleum exploration and production Written by a preeminent petroleum geologist and sedimentologist with decades of petroleum exploration in remote corners of the world Contains information pertinent to geophysicists, geologists, and petroleum reservoir engineers Updated statistics throughout Additional figures to illustrate key points and new developments New information on drilling activity and production methods including crude oil, directional drilling, thermal techniques, and gas plays Added coverage of 3D seismic interpretation New section on pressure compartments New section on hydrocarbon adsorption and absorption in source rocks Coverage of The Orinoco Heavy Oil Belt of Venezuela Updated chapter on unconventional petroleum

Fluvial-Tidal Sedimentology

Fluvial-Tidal Sedimentology
A Book

by Anonim

  • Publisher : Elsevier
  • Release : 2015-11-26
  • Pages : 656
  • ISBN : 0444635394
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Fluvial-Tidal Sedimentology provides information on the ‘Tidal-Fluvial Transition', the transition zone between river and tidal environments, and includes contributions that address some of the most fundamental research questions, including how the morphology of the tidal-fluvial transition zone evolves over short (days) and long (decadal) time periods and for different tidal and fluvial regimes, the structure of the river flow as it varies in its magnitude over tidal currents and how this changes at the mixing interface between fresh and saline water and at the turbidity maximum, the role of suspended sediment in controlling bathymetric change and bar growth and the role of fine-grained sediment (muds and flocs), whether it is possible to differentiate between ‘fluvial’ and ‘tidally’ influenced bedforms as preserved in bars and within the adjacent floodplain and what are the diagnostic sedimentary facies of tidal-fluvial deposits and how are these different from ‘pure’ fluvial and tidal deposits, amongst other topics. The book presents the latest research on the processes and deposits of the tidal-fluvial transition, documenting recent major field programs that have quantified the flow, sediment transport, and bed morphology in tidal-fluvial zones. It uses description of contemporary environments and ancient outcrop analogues to characterize the facies change through the tidal-fluvial transition. Presents the latest outcomes from recent, large, integrated field programs in estuaries around the world Gives detailed field descriptions (outcrop, borehole, core, contemporary sediments) of tidal-fluvial deposits Accesses new models and validation datasets for estuarine processes and deposits Presents descriptions of contemporary environments and ancient outcrop analogues to characterize the facies change through the tidal-fluvial transition

Advances in Carbonate Exploration and Reservoir Analysis

Advances in Carbonate Exploration and Reservoir Analysis
A Book

by J. Garland,J. E. Neilson,Stephen Ernest Laubach,Katherine J. Whidden

  • Publisher : Geological Society of London
  • Release : 2012
  • Pages : 311
  • ISBN : 1862393508
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Carbonate reservoirs contain an increasingly important percentage of the worlds hydrocarbon reserves. This volume presents key recent advances in carbonate exploration and reservoir analysis.

Practical Reservoir Engineering and Characterization

Practical Reservoir Engineering and Characterization
A Book

by Richard O. Baker,Harvey W. Yarranton,Jerry Jensen

  • Publisher : Gulf Professional Publishing
  • Release : 2015-04-30
  • Pages : 534
  • ISBN : 0128018232
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Practical Reservoir Characterization expertly explains key technologies, concepts, methods, and terminology in a way that allows readers in varying roles to appreciate the resulting interpretations and contribute to building reservoir characterization models that improve resource definition and recovery even in the most complex depositional environments. It is the perfect reference for senior reservoir engineers who want to increase their awareness of the latest in best practices, but is also ideal for team members who need to better understand their role in the characterization process. The text focuses on only the most critical areas, including modeling the reservoir unit, predicting well behavior, understanding past reservoir performance, and forecasting future reservoir performance. The text begins with an overview of the methods required for analyzing, characterizing, and developing real reservoirs, then explains the different methodologies and the types and sources of data required to characterize, forecast, and simulate a reservoir. Thoroughly explains the data gathering methods required to characterize, forecast, and simulate a reservoir Provides the fundamental background required to analyze, characterize, and develop real reservoirs in the most complex depositional environments Presents a step-by-step approach for building a one, two, or three-dimensional representation of all reservoir types

Physical Properties of Rocks

Physical Properties of Rocks
A Workbook

by Jürgen Schön

  • Publisher : Elsevier
  • Release : 2011
  • Pages : 481
  • ISBN : 0444537961
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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A symbiosis of a brief description of physical fundamentals of the rock properties (based on typical experimental results and relevant theories and models) with a guide for practical use of different theoretical concepts.

Reservoir Engineering Ebook Collection

Reservoir Engineering Ebook Collection
Ultimate Cd

by Faruk Civan Phd,John R. Fanchi,Wilson C. Chin,L. P. Dake,Tarek Ahmed Phd Pe,Roger M Slatt

  • Publisher : Gulf Professional Pub
  • Release : 2008-07-22
  • Pages : 5010
  • ISBN : 9781856175647
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Reservoir Engineering ebook Collection contains 7 of our best-selling titles, providing the ultimate reference for every reservoir engineer's library. Get access to over 5000 pages of reference material, at a fraction of the price of the hard-copy books. This CD contains the complete ebooks of the following 7 titles: Civan, Reservoir Formation Damage 2nd Edition, 9780750677387 FANCHI, Principles of Applied Reservoir Simulation 3rd Edition, 9780750679336 Chin, Quantitative Methods in Reservoir Engineering, 9780750675680 Dake, The Practice of Reservoir Engineering, 9780444506719 Ahmed, Reservoir Engineering Handbook 3rd Edition, 9780750679725 Ahmed, Advanced Reservoir Engineering, 9780750677332 Slatt , Stratigraphic reservoir characterization for petroleum geologists, geophysicists and engineers, 9780444528186 *Seven fully searchable titles on one CD providing instant access to the ULTIMATE library of engineering materials for professionals in the petroleum industry *5000 pages of practical and theoretical reservoir engineering information in one portable package. *Incredible value at a fraction of the cost of the print books