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The New Negro

The New Negro
The Life of Alain Locke

by Jeffrey C. Stewart

  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Release : 2018
  • Pages : 932
  • ISBN : 019508957X
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Winner of the 2018 National Book Award for Nonfiction. A tiny, fastidiously dressed man emerged from Black Philadelphia around the turn of the century to mentor a generation of young artists including Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, and Jacob Lawrence and call them the New Negro -- the creative African Americans whose art, literature, music, and drama would inspire Black people to greatness. In The New Negro: The Life of Alain Locke, Jeffrey C. Stewart offers the definitive biography of the father of the Harlem Renaissance, based on the extant primary sources of his life and on interviews with those who knew him personally. He narrates the education of Locke, including his becoming the first African American Rhodes Scholar and earning a PhD in philosophy at Harvard University, and his long career as a professor at Howard University. Locke also received a cosmopolitan, aesthetic education through his travels in continental Europe, where he came to appreciate the beauty of art and experienced a freedom unknown to him in the United States. And yet he became most closely associated with the flowering of Black culture in Jazz Age America and his promotion of the literary and artistic work of African Americans as the quintessential creations of American modernism. In the process he looked to Africa to find the proud and beautiful roots of the race. Shifting the discussion of race from politics and economics to the arts, he helped establish the idea that Black urban communities could be crucibles of creativity. Stewart explores both Locke's professional and private life, including his relationships with his mother, his friends, and his white patrons, as well as his lifelong search for love as a gay man. Stewart's thought-provoking biography recreates the worlds of this illustrious, enigmatic man who, in promoting the cultural heritage of Black people, became -- in the process -- a New Negro himself.

The New Negro

The New Negro
A Book

by Alain Locke

  • Publisher : Simon and Schuster
  • Release : 1925
  • Pages : 452
  • ISBN : 0684838311
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Part I, The Negro renaissance: The New Negro; Negro Art and America; The Negro in American Literature; Negro Youth speaks; Fiction; Poetry; Drama; Music; The Negro digs up his Past; Part II, The New Negro in a New World: The Negro Pioneers; The New frontage on American Life; The New Scene; The Negro and the American Tradition; Worlds of Color

The New Negro

The New Negro
A Book

by Alain Locke

  • Publisher : Graphic Arts Books
  • Release : 2021-03-24
  • Pages : 352
  • ISBN : 1513287419
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The New Negro (1925) is an anthology by Alain Locke. Expanded from a March issue of Survey Graphic magazine, The New Negro compiles writing from such figures as Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Jean Toomer, and Locke himself. Recognized as a foundational text of the Harlem Renaissance, the collection is organized around Locke’s writing on the function of art in reorganizing the conception of African American life and culture. Through self-understanding, creation, and independence, Locke’s New Negro came to represent a break from an inhumane past, a means toward meaningful change for a people held down for far too long. “[F]or generations in the mind of America, the Negro has been more of a formula than a human being—a something to be argued about, condemned or defended, to be ‘kept down,’ or ‘in his place,’ or ‘helped up,’ to be worried with or worried over, harassed or patronized, a social bogey or a social burden.” Identifying the representation of black Americans in the national imaginary as oppressive in nature, Locke suggests a way forward through his theory of the New Negro, who “wishes to be known for what he is, even in his faults and shortcomings, and scorns a craven and precarious survival at the price of seeming to be what he is not.” Throughout The New Negro, leading artists and intellectuals of the Harlem Renaissance offer their unique visions of who and what they are; voicing their concerns, portraying injustice, and illuminating the black experience, they provide a holistic vision of self-expression in all of its colors and forms. With a beautifully designed cover and professionally typeset manuscript, this edition of Alain Locke’s The New Negro is a classic of African American literature reimagined for modern readers.

The New Negro Aesthetic

The New Negro Aesthetic
Selected Writings

by Alain Locke

  • Publisher : Penguin Classics
  • Release : 2022-01-18
  • Pages : 368
  • ISBN : 9780143135210
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer edits a collection of Alain Locke's influential essays on the importance of the Black artist and the Black imagination A Penguin Classic For months, the philosopher Alain Locke wrestled with the idea of the Negro as America's most vexing problem. He asked how shall Negroes think of themselves as he considered the new crop of poets, novelists, and short story writers who, in 1924, wrote about their experiences as Black people in America. He did not want to frame Harlem and Black writing as yet another protest against racism, nor did he want to focus on the sociological perspective on the "Negro problem" and Harlem as a site of crime, poverty, and dysfunction. He wanted to find new language and a new way for Black people to think of themselves. The essays and articles collected in this volume, by Locke's Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer, are the result of that new attitude and the struggle to instill that New Negro aesthetics, as Stewart calls it here, into the mind of the twentieth century. To be a New Negro poet, novelist, actor, musician, dancer, or filmmaker was to commit oneself to an arc of self-discovery of what and who the Negro was--would be--without fear that one would disappoint the white or Black bystander. In committing to that path, Locke asserted, one would uncover a "being-in-the-world" that was rich and bountiful in its creative possibilities, if Black people could turn off the noise of racism and see themselves for who they really are: a world of creative people who have transformed, powerfully and perpetually, the culture of wherever history or social forces landed them.

The Works of Alain Locke

The Works of Alain Locke
A Book

by Charles Molesworth

  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Release : 2012-06-11
  • Pages : 400
  • ISBN : 0199795096
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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With the publication of The New Negro in 1925, Alain Locke introduced readers all over the U.S. to the vibrant world of African American thought. As an author, editor, and patron, Locke rightly earned the appellation "Godfather of the Harlem Renaissance." Yet, his intellectual contributions extend far beyond that single period of cultural history. Throughout his life he penned essays, on topics ranging from John Keats to Sigmund Freud, in addition to his trenchant social commentary on race and society. The Works of Alain Locke provides the largest collection available of his brilliant essays, gathered from a career that spanned forty years. They cover an impressively broad field of subjects: philosophy, literature, the visual arts, music, the theory of value, race, politics, and multiculturalism. Alongside seminal works such as "The New Negro" the volume features essays like "The Ethics of Culture," "Apropos of Africa," and "Pluralism and Intellectual Democracy." Together, these writings demonstrate Locke's standing as the leading African American thinker between W. E. B. Du Bois and Martin Luther King, Jr. The foreword by Henry Louis Gates Jr. and the introduction by

Inventing the New Negro

Inventing the New Negro
Narrative, Culture, and Ethnography

by Daphne Lamothe

  • Publisher : University of Pennsylvania Press
  • Release : 2013-03-01
  • Pages : 240
  • ISBN : 0812204042
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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It is no coincidence, Daphne Lamothe writes, that so many black writers and intellectuals of the first half of the twentieth century either trained formally as ethnographers or worked as amateur collectors of folklore and folk culture. In Inventing the New Negro Lamothe explores the process by which key figures such as Zora Neale Hurston, Katherine Dunham, W. E. B. Du Bois, James Weldon Johnson, and Sterling Brown adapted ethnography and folklore in their narratives to create a cohesive, collective, and modern black identity. Lamothe explores how these figures assumed the roles of self-reflective translators and explicators of African American and African diasporic cultures to Western, largely white audiences. Lamothe argues that New Negro writers ultimately shifted the presuppositions of both literary modernism and modernist anthropology by making their narratives as much about ways of understanding as they were about any quest for objective knowledge. In critiquing the ethnographic framework within which they worked, they confronted the classist, racist, and cultural biases of the dominant society and challenged their readers to imagine a different set of relations between the powerful and the oppressed. Inventing the New Negro combines an intellectual history of one of the most important eras of African American letters with nuanced and original readings of seminal works of literature. It will be of interest not only to Harlem Renaissance scholars but to anyone who is interested in the intersections of culture, literature, folklore, and ethnography.

Alain Locke's "Enter the New Negro". Pivotal for a BLACK* identity in the 1920s?

Alain Locke's 'Enter the New Negro'. Pivotal for a BLACK* identity in the 1920s?
A Book

by Ayebatonyeseigha Christ

  • Publisher : GRIN Verlag
  • Release : 2018-05-18
  • Pages : 16
  • ISBN : 3668706069
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Seminar paper from the year 2018 in the subject History - America, grade: 1,3, University of Kassel (Amerikanistik), language: English, abstract: Identity. A word that defines our whole being as humans. Psychoanalytics in the likes of Sigmund Freud and Erik H. Erikson have asked themselves this very question, what is identity and how does it affect us as humans? Whilst identity has been beneficial for certain groups on earth, this hasn’t been the case for African Americans in the 19th and 20th century, as the trail-blazing cultural theorist Stuart Hall, in his inimitable way disputes it in "Cultural Identity and Diaspora". The identity of African Americans overall in the American Society has always been dictated by the majority society who were mostly white. The identity of African Americans was solely depicted in a negative light. With their new-found freedom, African Americans were bound to change the narrative of their thitherto identity, through their own efforts and making. Hence was born a literary movement, "Enter the New Negro" by the philosopher Alain Locke. In this term paper, an attempt is being made with the help of the book "Enter the New Negro" by Alain Locke to find out if his writings were pivotal for shaping the identity of African Americans in the arts and in the media during the 1920s.

Alain L. Locke

Alain L. Locke
The Biography of a Philosopher

by Leonard Harris,Charles Molesworth

  • Publisher : University of Chicago Press
  • Release : 2010-04-02
  • Pages : 448
  • ISBN : 0226317803
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Alain L. Locke (1886-1954), in his famous 1925 anthology TheNew Negro, declared that “the pulse of the Negro world has begun to beat in Harlem.” Often called the father of the Harlem Renaissance, Locke had his finger directly on that pulse, promoting, influencing, and sparring with such figures as Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Jacob Lawrence, Richmond Barthé, William Grant Still, Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, Ralph Bunche, and John Dewey. The long-awaited first biography of this extraordinarily gifted philosopher and writer, Alain L. Locke narrates the untold story of his profound impact on twentieth-century America’s cultural and intellectual life. Leonard Harris and Charles Molesworth trace this story through Locke’s Philadelphia upbringing, his undergraduate years at Harvard—where William James helped spark his influential engagement with pragmatism—and his tenure as the first African American Rhodes Scholar. The heart of their narrative illuminates Locke’s heady years in 1920s New York City and his forty-year career at Howard University, where he helped spearhead the adult education movement of the 1930s and wrote on topics ranging from the philosophy of value to the theory of democracy. Harris and Molesworth show that throughout this illustrious career—despite a formal manner that many observers interpreted as elitist or distant—Locke remained a warm and effective teacher and mentor, as well as a fierce champion of literature and art as means of breaking down barriers between communities. The multifaceted portrait that emerges from this engaging account effectively reclaims Locke’s rightful place in the pantheon of America’s most important minds.

The New Negro

The New Negro
Readings on Race, Representation, and African American Culture, 1892-1938

by Henry Louis Gates Jr.,Gene Andrew Jarrett

  • Publisher : Princeton University Press
  • Release : 2021-06-08
  • Pages : 608
  • ISBN : 1400827876
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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When African American intellectuals announced the birth of the "New Negro" around the turn of the twentieth century, they were attempting through a bold act of renaming to change the way blacks were depicted and perceived in America. By challenging stereotypes of the Old Negro, and declaring that the New Negro was capable of high achievement, black writers tried to revolutionize how whites viewed blacks--and how blacks viewed themselves. Nothing less than a strategy to re-create the public face of "the race," the New Negro became a dominant figure of racial uplift between Reconstruction and World War II, as well as a central idea of the Harlem, or New Negro, Renaissance. Edited by Henry Louis Gates, Jr., and Gene Andrew Jarrett, The New Negro collects more than one hundred canonical and lesser-known essays published between 1892 and 1938 that examine the issues of race and representation in African American culture. These readings--by writers including W.E.B. Du Bois, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Alain Locke, Carl Van Vechten, Zora Neale Hurston, and Richard Wright--discuss the trope of the New Negro, and the milieu in which this figure existed, from almost every conceivable angle. Political essays are joined by essays on African American fiction, poetry, drama, music, painting, and sculpture. More than fascinating historical documents, these essays remain essential to the way African American identity and history are still understood today.

New Negro

New Negro
A Book

by Alain Locke

  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 2021-03-24
  • Pages : 364
  • ISBN : 9781513208657
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The New Negro (1925) is an anthology by Alain Locke. Expanded from a March issue of Survey Graphic magazine, The New Negro compiles writing from such figures as Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Jean Toomer, and Locke himself. Recognized as a foundational text of the Harlem Renaissance, the collection is organized around Locke's writing on the function of art in reorganizing the conception of African American life and culture. Through self-understanding, creation, and independence, Locke's New Negro came to represent a break from an inhumane past, a means toward meaningful change for a people held down for far too long. "[F]or generations in the mind of America, the Negro has been more of a formula than a human being--a something to be argued about, condemned or defended, to be 'kept down, ' or 'in his place, ' or 'helped up, ' to be worried with or worried over, harassed or patronized, a social bogey or a social burden." Identifying the representation of black Americans in the national imaginary as oppressive in nature, Locke suggests a way forward through his theory of the New Negro, who "wishes to be known for what he is, even in his faults and shortcomings, and scorns a craven and precarious survival at the price of seeming to be what he is not." Throughout The New Negro, leading artists and intellectuals of the Harlem Renaissance offer their unique visions of who and what they are; voicing their concerns, portraying injustice, and illuminating the black experience, they provide a holistic vision of self-expression in all of its colors and forms. With a beautifully designed cover and professionally typeset manuscript, this edition of Alain Locke's The New Negro is a classic of African American literature reimagined for modern readers.

Stony the Road

Stony the Road
Reconstruction, White Supremacy, and the Rise of Jim Crow

by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

  • Publisher : Penguin
  • Release : 2019-04-02
  • Pages : 320
  • ISBN : 052555954X
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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“Stony the Road presents a bracing alternative to Trump-era white nationalism. . . . In our current politics we recognize African-American history—the spot under our country’s rug where the terrorism and injustices of white supremacy are habitually swept. Stony the Road lifts the rug." —Nell Irvin Painter, New York Times Book Review A profound new rendering of the struggle by African-Americans for equality after the Civil War and the violent counter-revolution that resubjugated them, by the bestselling author of The Black Church. The abolition of slavery in the aftermath of the Civil War is a familiar story, as is the civil rights revolution that transformed the nation after World War II. But the century in between remains a mystery: if emancipation sparked "a new birth of freedom" in Lincoln's America, why was it necessary to march in Martin Luther King, Jr.'s America? In this new book, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., one of our leading chroniclers of the African-American experience, seeks to answer that question in a history that moves from the Reconstruction Era to the "nadir" of the African-American experience under Jim Crow, through to World War I and the Harlem Renaissance. Through his close reading of the visual culture of this tragic era, Gates reveals the many faces of Jim Crow and how, together, they reinforced a stark color line between white and black Americans. Bringing a lifetime of wisdom to bear as a scholar, filmmaker, and public intellectual, Gates uncovers the roots of structural racism in our own time, while showing how African Americans after slavery combatted it by articulating a vision of a "New Negro" to force the nation to recognize their humanity and unique contributions to America as it hurtled toward the modern age. The story Gates tells begins with great hope, with the Emancipation Proclamation, Union victory, and the liberation of nearly 4 million enslaved African-Americans. Until 1877, the federal government, goaded by the activism of Frederick Douglass and many others, tried at various turns to sustain their new rights. But the terror unleashed by white paramilitary groups in the former Confederacy, combined with deteriorating economic conditions and a loss of Northern will, restored "home rule" to the South. The retreat from Reconstruction was followed by one of the most violent periods in our history, with thousands of black people murdered or lynched and many more afflicted by the degrading impositions of Jim Crow segregation. An essential tour through one of America's fundamental historical tragedies, Stony the Road is also a story of heroic resistance, as figures such as W. E. B. Du Bois and Ida B. Wells fought to create a counter-narrative, and culture, inside the lion's mouth. As sobering as this tale is, it also has within it the inspiration that comes with encountering the hopes our ancestors advanced against the longest odds.

Political aspects in 'The New Negro'

Political aspects in 'The New Negro'
A Book

by Christoph Ellssel

  • Publisher : GRIN Verlag
  • Release : 2008-07-16
  • Pages : 15
  • ISBN : 3640104757
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The “Roaring Twenties” – a chapter of history which burst out with the extremes: On the one hand fascinating improvements in daily life, stunning inventions, new ideas about social systems – and on the other hand still a very strong racism, the widespread feeling of being lost and the beginning of the isolationism as a political solution to the problems of the world. New York was one of the strongholds of the movement, with especially the Harlem Renaissance, the movement of black art and culture taking place. But the movement was not only an eruption of artistic thoughts and works, but had also a political imagination. Due to the vast amount of literature, paintings and other works, I am going to focus only on “The New Negro”, edited by Alain Locke. This book “had the effects of a manifesto” and so is an acceptable basis for the search for the political face of the Harlem Renaissance or the New Negro Movement – two items which can easily be exchanged. Although it would be very interesting to go through The New Negro piece by piece and try to find political aspects of the single parts, due to the limited space of this Hausarbeit that must be left to future attempts. This limitation is further explained later on. A very interesting study has been done by Robert E. Washington in The Ideologies of African American Literature, which is dealing with the political aspect of African American literature and not only the Harlem Renaissance. The central question of this Hausarbeit searches for political aspects of the Harlem Renaissance at the example of The New Negro.

The New Negroes and Their Music

The New Negroes and Their Music
The Success of the Harlem Renaissance

by Jon Michael Spencer

  • Publisher : Univ. of Tennessee Press
  • Release : 1997
  • Pages : 171
  • ISBN : 9780870499678
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Spencer's discussion encompasses the music and writings of a wide range of important figures, including James Weldon Johnson, Harry T. Burleigh, Roland Hayes, Marian Anderson, Alain Locke, William Grant Still, R. Nathaniel Dett, and Dorothy Maynor. He argues that the singular accomplishment of the Harlem Renaissance composers and musicians was to achieve a "two-tiered mastery" promoted by Johnson, Locke, the Harmon award, and Crisis and Opportunity magazines.

Harlem Renaissance

Harlem Renaissance
A Handbook

by Ella O Williams

  • Publisher : AuthorHouse
  • Release : 2008-07-07
  • Pages : 236
  • ISBN : 9781452030579
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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“PRIOR TO THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE, BLACKS PORTRAY THEMSELVES AS STRANGS OBJECTS, ALIENATED FROM OTHERS IN THE SOCIETY.” The social activities in literature, art, theatre and entertainment in Harlem Renaissanc: a Handbook are documented for the period 1910-1940. A few intellectuals, specifically James Weldon Johnson, W E B DuBois, Charles Johnson and Alain Locke perceive that they, themselves, are the “New Negro.” Thus they produce and record the visual arts, literature and music they personally create as well as that of younger literary artists: Langston Hughes, Arna Bontemps, Countee Cullen and Roland Hayes. The literature, scholarship and criticism created among these intellectuals are mainly responsible for bringing about a renaissance. What is so unique about the Harlem Renaissance is that it is totally perceived and criticized by white American literary standards. At no time in African American history has there been an era wherein self-proclaimed intellectuals record their own literary activities as they are being created. That single concept is the focus of the research in Harlem Renaissance: a Handbook. Identifying each Major and Other Figures of the Harlem Renaissance permits the reader to experience the life and time of the era. The influx of African American literature requires the need to study the artists and to document the literary and creative arts of the Harlem Renaissance. View the photos and read the biography of the intellectuals as they live through an era devoted to illuminating Negro life as it actually exists in America. Most helpful to the reader is the Chronology of literary arts and corresponding activities of the Harlem Renaissance. During the years 1910-1940 the titles of articles, theatrical productions, books, poetry, music, visual arts and literature created during this period have been documented. The items chosen for the Chronology are not exhaustive, but they represent nearly all the literature and activities created during the Harlem Renaissance. Harlem Renaissance, a Handbook is a journey through time wherein literary and artistic history is documented as it occurs. With the aid of local New York Publishing companies, intellectuals encourage younger literary artists to publish only Negro folk life and culture as it actually exists.

The new negro

The new negro
A Book

by Anonim

  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 1968
  • Pages : 329
  • ISBN : 9876543210XXX
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The Philosophy of Alain Locke

The Philosophy of Alain Locke
Harlem Renaissance and Beyond

by Leonard Harris

  • Publisher : Temple University Press
  • Release : 1989-01
  • Pages : 332
  • ISBN : 9780877225843
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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This collection of essays by American philosopher Alain Locke (1885-1954) makes readily available for the first time his important writings on cultural pluralism, value relativism, and critical relativism. As a black philosopher early in this century, Locke was a pioneer: having earned both undergraduate and doctoral degrees at Harvard, he was a Rhodes scholar at Oxford, studied at the University of Berlin, and chaired the Philosophy Department at Howard University for almost four decades. He was perhaps best known as a leading figure in the Harlem Renaissance. Locke’s works in philosophy—many previously unpublished—conceptually frame the Harlem Renaissance and New Negro movement and provide an Afro-American critique of pragmatism and value absolutism, and also offer a view of identity, communicative competency, and contextualism. In addition, his major works on the nature of race, race relations, and the role of race-conscious literature are presented to demonstrate the application of his philosophy. Locke’s commentaries on the major philosophers of his day, including James, Royce, Santayana, Perry, and Ehrenfels help tell the story of his relationship to his former teachers and his theoretical affinities. In his substantial Introduction and interpretive concluding chapter, Leonard Harris describes Locke’s life, evaluates his role as an American philosopher and theoretician of the Harlem Renaissance, situates him in the pragmatist tradition, and outlines his affinities with modern deconstructionist ideas. A chronology of the philosopher’s life and bibliography of his works are also provided. Although much has been written about Alain Locke, this is the first book to focus on his philosophical contributions.

Alain Locke and Philosophy

Alain Locke and Philosophy
A Quest for Cultural Pluralism

by Johnny Washington

  • Publisher : Praeger
  • Release : 1986
  • Pages : 246
  • ISBN : 9876543210XXX
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Washington provides the first systematic critical look at the life and work of Alain Locke, an important American philosopher, in the context of a thoroughgoing analysis of the values, ideals, aspirations, and problems of the Black community. Alain Locke contributed significantly to the twentieth-century dialogue on ethics and society. Drawing particularly on the work of William James and Josiah Royce, Locke was perhaps the first to bring philosophy to bear on the problems of race relations and social justice in a multiracial society. He argued that racial problems in the United States stem from the fact that white Americans hold up their values as the only controlling and only acceptable model, to which other groups are forced to conform. First discussing what is meant by Black philosophy and what its concerns include, the author examines Locke's philosophic interpretation of Black America's historical experience, contributions to culture, and struggles for social justice. He provides a critique of Locke's model of the political community, with special reference to the work of Hannah Arendt. Looking at the impact of Locke, DuBois, and others on the Black community, he discusses their relation to the Black Elite, their encouragement of Black artists and their positions on educational issues such as teaching Black history, parity for Blacks, and school desegregation. Other subjects considered are the New Negro, the Harlem Renaissance, African art and culture, and Locke's views in light of changes that have occurred since his death in 1954. An important work on a philosopher whose insights are of continuing significance today, this book will be of interest for Afro-American studies, as well as for courses on American philosophy and American social and intellectual history.

Eric Walrond

Eric Walrond
A Life in the Harlem Renaissance and the Transatlantic Caribbean

by James Davis

  • Publisher : Columbia University Press
  • Release : 2015-02-24
  • Pages : 416
  • ISBN : 0231538618
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Eric Walrond (1898–1966) was a writer, journalist, caustic critic, and fixture of 1920s Harlem. His short story collection, Tropic Death, was one of the first efforts by a black author to depict Caribbean lives and voices in American fiction. Restoring Walrond to his proper place as a luminary of the Harlem Renaissance, this biography situates Tropic Death within the author's broader corpus and positions the work as a catalyst and driving force behind the New Negro literary movement in America. James Davis follows Walrond from the West Indies to Panama, New York, France, and finally England. He recounts his relationships with New Negro authors such as Countée Cullen, Charles S. Johnson, Zora Neale Hurston, Alain Locke, and Gwendolyn Bennett, as well as the white novelist Carl Van Vechten. He also recovers Walrond's involvement with Marcus Garvey's journal Negro World and the National Urban League journal Opportunity and examines the writer's work for mainstream venues, including Vanity Fair. In 1929, Walrond severed ties with Harlem, but he did not disappear. He contributed to the burgeoning anticolonial movement and print culture centered in England and fueled by C. L. R. James, George Padmore, and other Caribbean expatriates. His history of Panama, shelved by his publisher during the Great Depression, was the first to be written by a West Indian author. Unearthing documents in England, Panama, and the United States, and incorporating interviews, criticism of Walrond's fiction and journalism, and a sophisticated account of transnational black cultural formations, Davis builds an eloquent and absorbing narrative of an overlooked figure and his creation of modern American and world literature.

Philosophy Born of Struggle

Philosophy Born of Struggle
Anthology of Afro-American Philosophy from 1917

by Leonard Harris

  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 1983
  • Pages : 316
  • ISBN : 9876543210XXX
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Alain Locke

Alain Locke
Faith and Philosophy

by Christopher Buck

  • Publisher : Kalimat Press
  • Release : 2005
  • Pages : 302
  • ISBN : 9781890688387
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Alain Locke was one of the leading African American intellectuals of his day. Best known as the father of the Harlem Renaissance - the mastermind behind the explosion of black music, literature, and art during the 1920s and 1930s that centered in New York - he also pioneered calls for multicultural democracy and cultural pluralism, tirelessly demanding that America make good on its promises of interracial equality. Locke became a Baha'i in 1918, and remained a believer until his death. While his contributions to African American history have been widely appreciated, Locke's commitment to the Baha'i Faith is not widely known or understood. Here is the first and only serious, scholarly study of Locke's identity and commitment as a Baha'i. The book provides exhaustive evidence of Locke's conversion; his two pilgrimages to the Baha'i Shrines in the Holy Land; his correspondence with Shoghi Effendi Rabbani, then Guardian of the Baha'i Faith; and his years of estrangement from the Washington, D.C., Baha'i community. Beyond this, the book explores Locke's ideas of "spiritual democracy" and demonstrates how the Baha'i principles of the unity of humanity and "unity in diversity" influenced Locke's thinking - and how Locke also left his mark on Baha'i ideals.