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The Strange Career of William Ellis

The Strange Career of William Ellis
The Texas Slave Who Became a Mexican Millionaire

by Karl Jacoby

  • Publisher : W. W. Norton
  • Release : 2017-06-06
  • Pages : 352
  • ISBN : 9780393354171
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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A black child born on the US-Mexico border in the twilight of slavery, William Ellis inhabited a world divided along ambiguous racial lines. Adopting the name Guillermo Eliseo, he passed as Mexican, transcending racial lines to become fabulously wealthy as a Wall Street banker, diplomat, and owner of scores of mines and haciendas south of the border. In The Strange Career of William Ellis, prize-winning historian Karl Jacoby weaves an astonishing tale of cunning and scandal, offering fresh insights on the history of the Reconstruction era, the US-Mexico border, and the abiding riddle of race in America.

The Strange Career of William Ellis: The Texas Slave Who Became a Mexican Millionaire

The Strange Career of William Ellis: The Texas Slave Who Became a Mexican Millionaire
A Book

by Karl Jacoby

  • Publisher : W. W. Norton & Company
  • Release : 2016-06-13
  • Pages : 352
  • ISBN : 0393253864
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Winner of the Ray Allen Billington Prize and the Phillis Wheatley Book Award "An American 'Odyssey,' the larger-than-life story of a man who travels far in the wake of war and gets by on his adaptability and gift for gab." —Wall Street Journal A black child born on the US-Mexico border in the twilight of slavery, William Ellis inhabited a world divided along ambiguous racial lines. Adopting the name Guillermo Eliseo, he passed as Mexican, transcending racial lines to become fabulously wealthy as a Wall Street banker, diplomat, and owner of scores of mines and haciendas south of the border. In The Strange Career of William Ellis, prize-winning historian Karl Jacoby weaves an astonishing tale of cunning and scandal, offering fresh insights on the history of the Reconstruction era, the US-Mexico border, and the abiding riddle of race in America.

Reassembling the Strange

Reassembling the Strange
Naturalists, Missionaries, and the Environment of Nineteenth-Century Madagascar

by Thomas Anderson

  • Publisher : Rowman & Littlefield
  • Release : 2018-10-15
  • Pages : 250
  • ISBN : 1498576060
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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This book examines how Western naturalists and missionaries understood the environment of Madagascar during the nineteenth century.

Black Land

Black Land
Imperial Ethiopianism and African America

by Nadia Nurhussein

  • Publisher : Princeton University Press
  • Release : 2019-09-10
  • Pages : 192
  • ISBN : 0691194130
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The first book to explore how African American writing and art engaged with visions of Ethiopia during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries As the only African nation, with the exception of Liberia, to remain independent during the colonization of the continent, Ethiopia has long held significance for and captivated the imaginations of African Americans. In Black Land, Nadia Nurhussein delves into nineteenth- and twentieth-century African American artistic and journalistic depictions of Ethiopia, illuminating the increasing tensions and ironies behind cultural celebrations of an African country asserting itself as an imperial power. Nurhussein navigates texts by Walt Whitman, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Pauline Hopkins, Harry Dean, Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, George Schuyler, and others, alongside images and performances that show the intersection of African America with Ethiopia during historic political shifts. From a description of a notorious 1920 Star Order of Ethiopia flag-burning demonstration in Chicago to a discussion of the Ethiopian emperor Haile Selassie as Time magazine’s Man of the Year for 1935, Nurhussein illuminates the growing complications that modern Ethiopia posed for American writers and activists. American media coverage of the African nation exposed a clear contrast between the Pan-African ideal and the modern reality of Ethiopia as an antidemocratic imperialist state: Did Ethiopia represent the black nation of the future, or one of an inert and static past? Revising current understandings of black transnationalism, Black Land presents a well-rounded exploration of an era when Ethiopia’s presence in African American culture was at its height.

Critical Readings in the History of Christian Mission

Critical Readings in the History of Christian Mission
Volume 3

by Martha Frederiks,Dorottya Nagy

  • Publisher : BRILL
  • Release : 2021-06-22
  • Pages : 460
  • ISBN : 9004399607
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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This selection of texts introduces students and researchers to the multi- and interdisciplinary field of mission history. The four parts of this book acquaint the readers with methodological considerations and recurring themes in the academic study of the history of mission. Part one revolves around methods, part two documents approaches, while parts three and four consist of thematic clusters, such as mission and language, medical mission, mission and education, women and mission, mission and politics, and mission and art.Critical Readings in the History of Christian Mission is suitable for course-work and other educational purposes.

Country of the Cursed and the Driven

Country of the Cursed and the Driven
Slavery and the Texas Borderlands

by Paul Barba

  • Publisher : U of Nebraska Press
  • Release : 2021-12
  • Pages : 570
  • ISBN : 1496208358
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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A sweeping, comparative analysis of the slaving regimes of Hispanic, Comanche, and Anglo American communities in the Texas borderlands during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Finding Afro-Mexico

Finding Afro-Mexico
Race and Nation after the Revolution

by Theodore W. Cohen

  • Publisher : Cambridge University Press
  • Release : 2020-04-30
  • Pages : 129
  • ISBN : 1108671179
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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In 2015, the Mexican state counted how many of its citizens identified as Afro-Mexican for the first time since independence. Finding Afro-Mexico reveals the transnational interdisciplinary histories that led to this celebrated reformulation of Mexican national identity. It traces the Mexican, African American, and Cuban writers, poets, anthropologists, artists, composers, historians, and archaeologists who integrated Mexican history, culture, and society into the African Diaspora after the Revolution of 1910. Theodore W. Cohen persuasively shows how these intellectuals rejected the nineteenth-century racial paradigms that heralded black disappearance when they made blackness visible first in Mexican culture and then in post-revolutionary society. Drawing from more than twenty different archives across the Americas, this cultural and intellectual history of black visibility, invisibility, and community-formation questions the racial, cultural, and political dimensions of Mexican history and Afro-diasporic thought.

Shape Shifters

Shape Shifters
Journeys across Terrains of Race and Identity

by Lily Anne Y. Welty Tamai,Ingrid Dineen-Wimberly,Paul Spickard

  • Publisher : U of Nebraska Press
  • Release : 2020
  • Pages : 432
  • ISBN : 1496206630
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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​Shape Shifters presents a wide-ranging array of essays that examine peoples of mixed racial identity across a broad swath of space and time to understand the fluid nature of racial identities.

David Griffiths and the Missionary "History of Madagascar"

David Griffiths and the Missionary 'History of Madagascar'
A Book

by Gwyn Campbell

  • Publisher : BRILL
  • Release : 2012-04-03
  • Pages : 1
  • ISBN : 9004209808
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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This book reveals the hitherto hidden history of inter-missionary dispute that split the first LMS mission to Madagascar. Focussing on David Griffiths, whose pivotal role was concealed by the LMS, it suggests that Welsh-English rivalry moulded the mission’s destiny.

The Republic for Which It Stands

The Republic for Which It Stands
The United States during Reconstruction and the Gilded Age, 1865-1896

by Richard White

  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Release : 2017-08-04
  • Pages : 912
  • ISBN : 0190619066
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The Oxford History of the United States is the most respected multivolume history of the American nation. In the newest volume in the series, The Republic for Which It Stands, acclaimed historian Richard White offers a fresh and integrated interpretation of Reconstruction and the Gilded Age as the seedbed of modern America. At the end of the Civil War the leaders and citizens of the victorious North envisioned the country's future as a free-labor republic, with a homogenous citizenry, both black and white. The South and West were to be reconstructed in the image of the North. Thirty years later Americans occupied an unimagined world. The unity that the Civil War supposedly secured had proved ephemeral. The country was larger, richer, and more extensive, but also more diverse. Life spans were shorter, and physical well-being had diminished, due to disease and hazardous working conditions. Independent producers had become wage earners. The country was Catholic and Jewish as well as Protestant, and increasingly urban and industrial. The "dangerous" classes of the very rich and poor expanded, and deep differences -- ethnic, racial, religious, economic, and political -- divided society. The corruption that gave the Gilded Age its name was pervasive. These challenges also brought vigorous efforts to secure economic, moral, and cultural reforms. Real change -- technological, cultural, and political -- proliferated from below more than emerging from political leadership. Americans, mining their own traditions and borrowing ideas, produced creative possibilities for overcoming the crises that threatened their country. In a work as dramatic and colorful as the era it covers, White narrates the conflicts and paradoxes of these decades of disorienting change and mounting unrest, out of which emerged a modern nation whose characteristics resonate with the present day.

Classifying Christians

Classifying Christians
Ethnography, Heresiology, and the Limits of Knowledge in Late Antiquity

by Todd S. Berzon

  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 2021-05-25
  • Pages : 316
  • ISBN : 0520383176
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Classifying Christians investigates late antique Christian heresiologies as ethnographies that catalogued and detailed the origins, rituals, doctrines, and customs of the heretics in explicitly polemical and theological terms. Oscillating between ancient ethnographic evidence and contemporary ethnographic writing, Todd S. Berzon argues that late antique heresiology shares an underlying logic with classical ethnography in the ancient Mediterranean world. By providing an account of heresiological writing from the second to fifth century, Classifying Christians embeds heresiology within the historical development of imperial forms of knowledge that have shaped western culture from antiquity to the present.

Porous Borders

Porous Borders
Multiracial Migrations and the Law in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

by Julian Lim

  • Publisher : UNC Press Books
  • Release : 2017-10-10
  • Pages : 320
  • ISBN : 146963550X
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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With the railroad's arrival in the late nineteenth century, immigrants of all colors rushed to the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, transforming the region into a booming international hub of economic and human activity. Following the stream of Mexican, Chinese, and African American migration, Julian Lim presents a fresh study of the multiracial intersections of the borderlands, where diverse peoples crossed multiple boundaries in search of new economic opportunities and social relations. However, as these migrants came together in ways that blurred and confounded elite expectations of racial order, both the United States and Mexico resorted to increasingly exclusionary immigration policies in order to make the multiracial populations of the borderlands less visible within the body politic, and to remove them from the boundaries of national identity altogether. Using a variety of English- and Spanish-language primary sources from both sides of the border, Lim reveals how a borderlands region that has traditionally been defined by Mexican-Anglo relations was in fact shaped by a diverse population that came together dynamically through work and play, in the streets and in homes, through war and marriage, and in the very act of crossing the border.

The Limits of Liberty

The Limits of Liberty
Mobility and the Making of the Eastern U.S.-Mexico Border

by James David Nichols

  • Publisher : U of Nebraska Press
  • Release : 2018-07
  • Pages : 378
  • ISBN : 1496207254
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The Limits of Liberty chronicles the formation of the U.S.-Mexico border from the perspective of the “mobile peoples” who assisted in determining the international boundary from both sides in the mid-nineteenth century. In this historic and timely study, James David Nichols argues against the many top-down connotations that borders carry, noting that the state cannot entirely dominate the process of boundary marking. Even though there were many efforts on the part of the United States and Mexico to define the new international border as a limit, mobile peoples continued to transgress the border and cross it with impunity. Transborder migrants reimagined the dividing line as a gateway to opportunity rather than as a fence limiting their movement. Runaway slaves, Mexican debt peones, and seminomadic Native Americans saw liberty on the other side of the line and crossed in search of greater opportunity. In doing so they devised their own border epistemology that clashed with official understandings of the boundary. These divergent understandings resulted in violence with the crossing of vigilantes, soldiers, and militias in search of fugitives and runaways. The Limits of Liberty explores how the border attracted migrants from both sides and considers border-crossers together, whereas most treatments thus far have considered discrete social groups along the border. Mining Mexican archival sources, Nichols is one of the first scholars to explore the nuance of negotiation that took place between the state and mobile peoples in the formation of borders.

Racial Migrations

Racial Migrations
New York City and the Revolutionary Politics of the Spanish Caribbean

by Jesse Hoffnung-Garskof

  • Publisher : Princeton University Press
  • Release : 2019-05-07
  • Pages : 408
  • ISBN : 0691183538
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The gripping history of Afro-Latino migrants who conspired to overthrow a colonial monarchy, end slavery, and secure full citizenship in their homelands In the late nineteenth century, a small group of Cubans and Puerto Ricans of African descent settled in the segregated tenements of New York City. At an immigrant educational society in Greenwich Village, these early Afro-Latino New Yorkers taught themselves to be poets, journalists, and revolutionaries. At the same time, these individuals—including Rafael Serra, a cigar maker, writer, and politician; Sotero Figueroa, a typesetter, editor, and publisher; and Gertrudis Heredia, one of the first women of African descent to study midwifery at the University of Havana—built a political network and articulated an ideal of revolutionary nationalism centered on the projects of racial and social justice. These efforts were critical to the poet and diplomat José Martí’s writings about race and his bid for leadership among Cuban exiles, and to the later struggle to create space for black political participation in the Cuban Republic. In Racial Migrations, Jesse Hoffnung-Garskof presents a vivid portrait of these largely forgotten migrant revolutionaries, weaving together their experiences of migrating while black, their relationships with African American civil rights leaders, and their evolving participation in nationalist political movements. By placing Afro-Latino New Yorkers at the center of the story, Hoffnung-Garskof offers a new interpretation of the revolutionary politics of the Spanish Caribbean, including the idea that Cuba could become a nation without racial divisions. A model of transnational and comparative research, Racial Migrations reveals the complexities of race-making within migrant communities and the power of small groups of immigrants to transform their home societies.

Spying on the South

Spying on the South
An Odyssey Across the American Divide

by Tony Horwitz

  • Publisher : Penguin
  • Release : 2019-05-14
  • Pages : 512
  • ISBN : 110198029X
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The New York Times-bestselling final book by the beloved, Pulitzer-Prize winning historian Tony Horwitz. With Spying on the South, the best-selling author of Confederates in the Attic returns to the South and the Civil War era for an epic adventure on the trail of America's greatest landscape architect. In the 1850s, the young Frederick Law Olmsted was adrift, a restless farmer and dreamer in search of a mission. He found it during an extraordinary journey, as an undercover correspondent in the South for the up-and-coming New York Times. For the Connecticut Yankee, pen name "Yeoman," the South was alien, often hostile territory. Yet Olmsted traveled for 14 months, by horseback, steamboat, and stagecoach, seeking dialogue and common ground. His vivid dispatches about the lives and beliefs of Southerners were revelatory for readers of his day, and Yeoman's remarkable trek also reshaped the American landscape, as Olmsted sought to reform his own society by creating democratic spaces for the uplift of all. The result: Central Park and Olmsted's career as America's first and foremost landscape architect. Tony Horwitz rediscovers Yeoman Olmsted amidst the discord and polarization of our own time. Is America still one country? In search of answers, and his own adventures, Horwitz follows Olmsted's tracks and often his mode of transport (including muleback): through Appalachia, down the Mississippi River, into bayou Louisiana, and across Texas to the contested Mexican borderland. Venturing far off beaten paths, Horwitz uncovers bracing vestiges and strange new mutations of the Cotton Kingdom. Horwitz's intrepid and often hilarious journey through an outsized American landscape is a masterpiece in the tradition of Great Plains, Bad Land, and the author's own classic, Confederates in the Attic.

Why Do We Still Talk About Race?

Why Do We Still Talk About Race?
A Book

by Martin Bulmer,John Solomos

  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Release : 2020-06-30
  • Pages : 212
  • ISBN : 0429768613
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The main objective of this edited collection is to provide an insight into key facets of contemporary research and scholarship on race and ethnicity. The various chapters were presented at a conference to celebrate the 40th Anniversary of the international journal Ethnic and Racial Studies. Given this context, contributors reflect on the evolution of scholarship over the past five decades, and look forward to the range of issues that we shall need to research and understand more fully in the future. In doing so they both provide an overview of the shifting boundaries of the field of ethnic and racial studies and display an engagement with emerging fields of scholarship and research. The volume brings together leading scholars who have experience of researching race and ethnicity in various parts of the globe, and combines conceptual reflection with empirically focused analysis. This book was originally published as a special issue of Ethnic and Racial Studies.

Shaped by the West, Volume 1

Shaped by the West, Volume 1
A History of North America to 1877

by William F. Deverell,Anne F. Hyde

  • Publisher : Univ of California Press
  • Release : 2018-08-14
  • Pages : 384
  • ISBN : 0520964373
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Shaped by the West is a two-volume primary source reader that rewrites the history of the United States through a western lens. America’s expansion west was the driving force for issues of democracy, politics, race, freedom, and property. William Deverell and Anne F. Hyde provide a nuanced look at the past, balancing topics in society and politics and representing all kinds of westerners—black and white, native and immigrant, male and female, powerful and powerless—from more than twenty states across the West and the shifting frontier. The sources included reflect the important role of the West in national narratives of American history, beginning with the pre-Columbian era in Volume 1 and taking us to the twenty-first century in Volume 2. Together, these volumes cover first encounters, conquests and revolts, indigenous land removal, slavery and labor, race, ethnicity and gender, trade and diplomacy, industrialization, migration and immigration, and changing landscapes and environments. Key Features & Benefits: Expertly curated personal letters, government documents, editorials, photos, and never before published materials offer lively, vivid introductions to the tools of history. Annotations, captions, and brief essays provide accessible entry points to an extraordinarily wide range of themes—adding context and perspective from leaders in the field. Highlights connections between western and national histories to foster critical thinking about America’s diverse past and today’s challenging issues.

Sweet Taste of Liberty

Sweet Taste of Liberty
A True Story of Slavery and Restitution in America

by W. Caleb McDaniel

  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Release : 2019-08-07
  • Pages : 288
  • ISBN : 019084700X
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The unforgettable saga of one enslaved woman's fight for justice--and reparations Born into slavery, Henrietta Wood was taken to Cincinnati and legally freed in 1848. In 1853, a Kentucky deputy sheriff named Zebulon Ward colluded with Wood's employer, abducted her, and sold her back into bondage. She remained enslaved throughout the Civil War, giving birth to a son in Mississippi and never forgetting who had put her in this position. By 1869, Wood had obtained her freedom for a second time and returned to Cincinnati, where she sued Ward for damages in 1870. Astonishingly, after eight years of litigation, Wood won her case: in 1878, a Federal jury awarded her $2,500. The decision stuck on appeal. More important than the amount, though the largest ever awarded by an American court in restitution for slavery, was the fact that any money was awarded at all. By the time the case was decided, Ward had become a wealthy businessman and a pioneer of convict leasing in the South. Wood's son later became a prominent Chicago lawyer, and she went on to live until 1912. McDaniel's book is an epic tale of a black woman who survived slavery twice and who achieved more than merely a moral victory over one of her oppressors. Above all, Sweet Taste of Liberty is a portrait of an extraordinary individual as well as a searing reminder of the lessons of her story, which establish beyond question the connections between slavery and the prison system that rose in its place.

On Juneteenth

On Juneteenth
A Book

by Annette Gordon-Reed

  • Publisher : Liveright Publishing
  • Release : 2021-05-04
  • Pages : 144
  • ISBN : 1631498843
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The essential, sweeping story of Juneteenth’s integral importance to American history, as told by a Pulitzer Prize–winning historian and Texas native. Weaving together American history, dramatic family chronicle, and searing episodes of memoir, Annette Gordon-Reed’s On Juneteenth provides a historian’s view of the country’s long road to Juneteenth, recounting both its origins in Texas and the enormous hardships that African-Americans have endured in the century since, from Reconstruction through Jim Crow and beyond. All too aware of the stories of cowboys, ranchers, and oilmen that have long dominated the lore of the Lone Star State, Gordon-Reed—herself a Texas native and the descendant of enslaved people brought to Texas as early as the 1820s—forges a new and profoundly truthful narrative of her home state, with implications for us all. Combining personal anecdotes with poignant facts gleaned from the annals of American history, Gordon-Reed shows how, from the earliest presence of Black people in Texas to the day in Galveston on June 19, 1865, when Major General Gordon Granger announced the end of legalized slavery in the state, African-Americans played an integral role in the Texas story. Reworking the traditional “Alamo” framework, she powerfully demonstrates, among other things, that the slave- and race-based economy not only defined the fractious era of Texas independence but precipitated the Mexican-American War and, indeed, the Civil War itself. In its concision, eloquence, and clear presentation of history, On Juneteenth vitally revises conventional renderings of Texas and national history. As our nation verges on recognizing June 19 as a national holiday, On Juneteenth is both an essential account and a stark reminder that the fight for equality is exigent and ongoing.

Zorro's Shadow

Zorro's Shadow
How a Mexican Legend Became America's First Superhero

by Stephen J. C. Andes

  • Publisher : Chicago Review Press
  • Release : 2020-09-15
  • Pages : 304
  • ISBN : 1641602961
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Long before Superman or Batman made their first appearances, there was Zorro. Born on the pages of the pulps in 1919, Zorro fenced his way through the American popular imagination, carving his signature letter Z into the flesh of evildoers in Old Spanish California. Zorro is the original caped crusader, the first hero to have a band called the Avengers, and the character who laid the blueprint for the modern American superhero: the mask, the alter-ego, extraordinary physical skills, and a struggle against arch-villains. Famed comics pioneer Bob Kane even wrote that &“Zorro was a major influence on my creation of Batman.&” In Zorro's Shadow, historian and Latin American studies expert Stephen J. C. Andes investigates the legends behind the mask of Zorro, revealing that the origin of America's first superhero lies in Latinx history and experience. Andes begins his investigation in Mexico City at a statue of William Lamport, the so-called &“Irish Zorro,&” who was burned at the stake by the Mexican Inquisition. There, he discovers new documents at the Mexican National Archives and travels to the Sonoran desert to find the birthplace of Joaqu&ín Murrieta, a California Gold Rush bandit who many claim inspired the creation of Zorro. Based on the never-before-seen letters of Zorro creator Johnston McCulley, Andes describes how the legends around Lamport and Murrieta influenced the development of the masked hero in black, and further, how Zorro went from a real life Mexican bandido to a distinctly white, aristocratic hero. Revealing the length of Zorro's shadow on the superhero genre is a reclamation of the legend of Zorro for a multiethnic and multicultural America.