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Thus Spoke Zarathustra

Thus Spoke Zarathustra
A Book for Everyone and Nobody

by Friedrich Nietzsche

  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Release : 2008-08-14
  • Pages : 384
  • ISBN : 0199537097
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Presents the author's ideas about the problem of living a fulfilling life in a meaningless world.

Thus Spake Zarathustra

Thus Spake Zarathustra
A Book

by Freidrich Nietzche

  • Publisher : BookRix
  • Release : 2019-01-08
  • Pages : 365
  • ISBN : 373680377X
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Thus Spake Zarathustra) is a philosophical novel by German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. The book chronicles the fictitious travels and speeches of Zarathustra. Zarathustra's namesake was the Persian founder of Zoroastrianism, usually known in English as Zoroaster. Nietzsche is clearly portraying a "new" or "different" Zarathustra, one who turns traditional morality on its head. He goes on to characterize "what the name of Zarathustra means in my mouth, the mouth of the first immoralist:" The book embodies a number of innovative poetical and rhetorical methods of expression. It serves as a parallel and supplement to the various philosophical ideas present in Nietzsche's body of work. He has, however, said that "among my writings my Zarathustra stands to my mind by itself." Emphasizing its centrality and its status as his magnum opus. Since many of the book's ideas are also present in his other works, Zarathustra is seen to have served as a precursor to his later philosophical thought. With the book, Nietzsche embraced a distinct aesthetic assiduity. He later reformulated many of his ideas, in Beyond Good and Evil and various other writings that he composed thereafter. He continued to emphasize his philosophical concerns; generally, his intention was to show an alternative to repressive moral codes and to avert "nihilism" in all of its varied forms. While Nietzsche injects myriad ideas into the book, a few recurring themes stand out. The overman (Übermensch), a self-mastered individual who has achieved his full power, is an almost omnipresent idea in Thus Spoke Zarathustra. Man as a race is merely a bridge between animals and the overman. Nietzsche also makes a point that the overman is not an end result for a person, but more the journey toward self-mastery. The eternal recurrence, found elsewhere in Nietzsche's writing, is also mentioned. "Eternal recurrence" is the possibility that all events in one's life will happen again and again, infinitely. The embrace of all of life's horrors and pleasures alike shows a deference and acceptance of fate, or Amor Fati. The love and acceptance of one's path in life is a defining characteristic of the overman. Faced with the knowledge that he would repeat every action that he has taken, an overman would be elated as he has no regrets and loves life. Opting to change any decision or event in one's life would indicate the presence of resentment or fear; contradistinctly the overman is characterized by courage and a Dionysian spirit. The will to power is the fundamental component of human nature. Everything we do is an expression of the will to power. The will to power is a psychological analysis of all human action and is accentuated by self-overcoming and self-enhancement. Contrasted with living for procreation, pleasure, or happiness, the will to power is the summary of all man's struggle against his surrounding environment as well as his reason for living in it.

Thus Spake Zarathustra

Thus Spake Zarathustra
A Book

by Frederich Nietzsche

  • Publisher : Arcturus Classics
  • Release : 2019-07
  • Pages : 304
  • ISBN : 9781789501025
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Thus Spake Zarathustra

Thus Spake Zarathustra
A Book

by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

  • Publisher : Courier Corporation
  • Release : 1999-01-05
  • Pages : 270
  • ISBN : 0486406636
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The author uses the ancient Persian religious leader, Zarathustra (or Zoroaster) to voice his own views, including the introduction of the controversial doctrine of the "Übermensch" or "superman."

Thus Spoke Zarathustra

Thus Spoke Zarathustra
A Book for All and None

by Friedrich Nietzsche

  • Publisher : Modern Library
  • Release : 1995-09-19
  • Pages : 368
  • ISBN : 0679601759
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Friedrich Nietzsche's most accessible and influential philosophical work, misquoted, misrepresented, brilliantly original and enormously influential, Thus Spoke Zarathustra is translated from the German by R.J. Hollingdale in Penguin Classics. Nietzsche was one of the most revolutionary and subversive thinkers in Western philosophy, and Thus Spoke Zarathustra remains his most famous and influential work. It describes how the ancient Persian prophet Zarathustra descends from his solitude in the mountains to tell the world that God is dead and that the Superman, the human embodiment of divinity, is his successor. Nietzsche's utterance 'God is dead', his insistence that the meaning of life is to be found in purely human terms, and his doctrine of the Superman and the will to power were all later seized upon and unrecognisably twisted by, among others, Nazi intellectuals. With blazing intensity and poetic brilliance, Nietzsche argues that the meaning of existence is not to be found in religious pieties or meek submission to authority, but in an all-powerful life force: passionate, chaotic and free. Frederich Nietzsche (1844-1900) became the chair of classical philology at Basel University at the age of 24 until his bad health forced him to retire in 1879. He divorced himself from society until his final collapse in 1899 when he became insane. A powerfully original thinker, Nietzsche's influence on subsequent writers, such as George Bernard Shaw, D.H. Lawrence, Thomas Mann and Jean-Paul Sartre, was considerable. If you enjoyed Thus Spoke Zarathustra you might like Nietzsche's Beyond Good and Evil, also available in Penguin Classics. 'Enigmatic, vatic, emphatic, passionate, often breathtakingly insightful, his works together make a unique statement in the literature of European ideas' A. C. Grayling

Thus Spake Zarathustra

Thus Spake Zarathustra
a book for all and none

by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

  • Publisher : MacMillan and Company
  • Release : 1896
  • Pages : 479
  • ISBN : 9876543210XXX
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Thus Spake Zarathustra Annotated

Thus Spake Zarathustra Annotated
A Book

by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 2021-01-10
  • Pages : 434
  • ISBN : 9876543210XXX
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Thus Spoke Zarathustra (German: Also sprach Zarathustra, sometimes translated Thus Spake Zarathustra), subtitled A Book for All and None (Ein Buch für Alle und Keinen), is a written work by German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, composed in four parts between 1883 and 1885. Much of the work deals with ideas such as the "eternal recurrence of the same", the parable on the "death of God", and the "prophecy" of the Overman, which were first introduced in The Gay Science.Described by Nietzsche himself as "the deepest ever written", the book is a dense and esoteric treatise on philosophy and morality, featuring as protagonist a fictionalized Zarathustra. A central irony of the text is that the style of the Bible is used by Nietzsche to present ideas of his which fundamentally oppose Judaeo-Christian morality and tradition.

Thus Spake Zarathustra

Thus Spake Zarathustra
Large Print

by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 2020-03-09
  • Pages : 346
  • ISBN : 9876543210XXX
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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We are delighted to publish this classic book as part of our extensive Classic Library collection. Many of the books in our collection have been out of print for decades, and therefore have not been accessible to the general public. The aim of our publishing program is to facilitate rapid access to this vast reservoir of literature, and our view is that this is a significant literary work, which deserves to be brought back into print after many decades in its original form. The contents of the vast majority of titles in the Classic Library have been scanned from the original works. To ensure a high quality product, each title has been meticulously hand curated by our staff. Our philosophy has been guided by a desire to provide the reader with a book that is as close as possible to ownership of the original work. We hope that you will enjoy this wonderful classic work, and that for you it becomes an enriching experience.

In Love with Life

In Love with Life
Reflections on Friedrich Nietzsche's Thus Spake Zarathustra

by Osho

  • Publisher : Osho Media International
  • Release : 2015-01-13
  • Pages : 192
  • ISBN : 0880506008
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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In his preface to Ecce Homo, Friedrich Nietzsche says this: “With [Thus Spoke Zarathustra] I have given mankind the greatest present that has ever been made to it so far. This book, with a voice bridging centuries, is not only the highest book there is, the book that is truly characterized by the air of the heights—the whole fact of man lies beneath it at a tremendous distance—it is also the deepest, born out of the innermost wealth of truth, an inexhaustible well to which no pail descends without coming up again filled with gold and goodness.” Perhaps only a contemporary mystic like Osho could truly understand what Nietzsche meant by this statement. In Love with Life shares Osho’s understanding of both Nietzsche the man and of his seminal work, with extraordinary clarity and relevance to readers in the 21st century. Ten chapters have been selected from a series of 43 talks given by Osho, first published as two volumes: Zarathustra: A God that Can Dance, and Zarathustra: The Laughing Prophet. Here, Nietzsche is rescued from any remaining taint brought on by the Nazi misunderstanding and appropriation of his work, and we also learn much about the mysterious and revolutionary Persian mystic Zarathustra (Zoroaster), whom Nietzsche chose as a spokesperson. The result is an enchanting journey through a world where life is celebrated, not renounced, and where timeless truths prevail over the lies and distortions that continue to cripple our efforts to become healthy and whole.

Thus Spake Zarathustra

Thus Spake Zarathustra
Nietzsche's Collections

by Nietzsche

  • Publisher : VM eBooks
  • Release : 2016-02-18
  • Pages : 492
  • ISBN : 9876543210XXX
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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INDEX FIRST PART. ZARATHUSTRA'S DISCOURSES. ZARATHUSTRA'S PROLOGUE. ZARATHUSTRA'S DISCOURSES. I. THE THREE METAMORPHOSES. II. THE ACADEMIC CHAIRS OF VIRTUE. III. BACKWORLDSMEN. IV. THE DESPISERS OF THE BODY. V. JOYS AND PASSIONS. VI. THE PALE CRIMINAL. VII. READING AND WRITING. VIII. THE TREE ON THE HILL. IX. THE PREACHERS OF DEATH. X. WAR AND WARRIORS. XI. THE NEW IDOL. XII. THE FLIES IN THE MARKET-PLACE. XIII. CHASTITY. XIV. THE FRIEND. XV. THE THOUSAND AND ONE GOALS. XVI. NEIGHBOUR-LOVE. XVII. THE WAY OF THE CREATING ONE. XVIII. OLD AND YOUNG WOMEN. XIX. THE BITE OF THE ADDER. XX. CHILD AND MARRIAGE. XXI. VOLUNTARY DEATH. XXII. THE BESTOWING VIRTUE. THUS SPAKE ZARATHUSTRA. SECOND PART. XXIII. THE CHILD WITH THE MIRROR. XXIV. IN THE HAPPY ISLES. XXV. THE PITIFUL. XXVI. THE PRIESTS. XXVII. THE VIRTUOUS. XXVIII. THE RABBLE. XXIX. THE TARANTULAS. XXX. THE FAMOUS WISE ONES. XXXI. THE NIGHT-SONG. XXXII. THE DANCE-SONG. XXXIII. THE GRAVE-SONG. XXXIV. SELF-SURPASSING. XXXV. THE SUBLIME ONES. XXXVI. THE LAND OF CULTURE. XXXVII. IMMACULATE PERCEPTION. XXXVIII. SCHOLARS. XXXIX. POETS. XL. GREAT EVENTS. XLI. THE SOOTHSAYER. XLII. REDEMPTION. XLIII. MANLY PRUDENCE. XLIV. THE STILLEST HOUR. THIRD PART. XLV. THE WANDERER. XLVI. THE VISION AND THE ENIGMA. XLVII. INVOLUNTARY BLISS. XLVIII. BEFORE SUNRISE. XLIX. THE BEDWARFING VIRTUE. L. ON THE OLIVE-MOUNT. LI. ON PASSING-BY. LII. THE APOSTATES. LIII. THE RETURN HOME. LIV. THE THREE EVIL THINGS. LV. THE SPIRIT OF GRAVITY. LVI. OLD AND NEW TABLES. LVII. THE CONVALESCENT. LVIII. THE GREAT LONGING. LIX. THE SECOND DANCE-SONG. LX. THE SEVEN SEALS. FOURTH AND LAST PART. LXI. THE HONEY SACRIFICE. LXII. THE CRY OF DISTRESS. LXIII. TALK WITH THE KINGS. LXIV. THE LEECH. LXV. THE MAGICIAN. LXVI. OUT OF SERVICE. LXVII. THE UGLIEST MAN. LXVIII. THE VOLUNTARY BEGGAR. LXIX. THE SHADOW. LXX. NOONTIDE. LXXI. THE GREETING. LXXII. THE SUPPER. LXXIII. THE HIGHER MAN. LXXIV. THE SONG OF MELANCHOLY. LXXV. SCIENCE. LXXVI. AMONG DAUGHTERS OF THE DESERT. LXXVII. THE AWAKENING. LXXVIII. THE ASS-FESTIVAL. LXXIX. THE DRUNKEN SONG. LXXX. THE SIGN. APPENDIX. NOTES ON "THUS SPAKE ZARATHUSTRA" BY ANTHONY M. LUDOVICI. PART I. THE PROLOGUE. Chapter I. The Three Metamorphoses. Chapter II. The Academic Chairs of Virtue. Chapter IV. The Despisers of the Body. Chapter IX. The Preachers of Death. Chapter XV. The Thousand and One Goals. Chapter XVIII. Old and Young Women. Chapter XXI. Voluntary Death. Chapter XXII. The Bestowing Virtue. PART II. Chapter XXIII. The Child with the Mirror. Chapter XXIV. In the Happy Isles. Chapter XXIX. The Tarantulas. Chapter XXX. The Famous Wise Ones. Chapter XXXIII. The Grave-Song. Chapter XXXIV. Self-Surpassing. Chapter XXXV. The Sublime Ones. Chapter XXXVI. The Land of Culture. Chapter XXXVII. Immaculate Perception. Chapter XXXVIII. Scholars. Chapter XXXIX. Poets. Chapter XL. Great Events. Chapter XLI. The Soothsayer. Chapter XLII. Redemption. Chapter XLIII. Manly Prudence. Chapter XLIV. The Stillest Hour. PART III. Chapter XLVI. The Vision and the Enigma. Chapter XLVII. Involuntary Bliss. Chapter XLVIII. Before Sunrise. Chapter XLIX. The Bedwarfing Virtue. Chapter LI. On Passing-by. Chapter LII. The Apostates. Chapter LIII. The Return Home. Chapter LIV. The Three Evil Things. Chapter LV. The Spirit of Gravity. Chapter LVI. Old and New Tables. Par. 2. Chapter LVII. The Convalescent. Chapter LX. The Seven Seals. PART IV. Chapter LXI. The Honey Sacrifice. Chapter LXII. The Cry of Distress. Chapter LXIII. Talk with the Kings. Chapter LXIV. The Leech. Chapter LXV. The Magician. Chapter LXVI. Out of Service. Chapter LXVII. The Ugliest Man. Chapter LXVIII. The Voluntary Beggar. Chapter LXIX. The Shadow. Chapter LXX. Noontide. Chapter LXXI. The Greeting. Chapter LXXII. The Supper. Chapter LXXIII. The Higher Man. Par. 1. Chapter LXXIV. The Song of Melancholy. Chapter LXXV. Science. Chapter LXXVI. Among the Daughters of the Desert. Chapter LXXVII. The Awakening. Chapter LXXVIII. The Ass-Festival. Chapter LXXIX. The Drunken Song. Chapter LXXX. The Sign.

Thus Spake Zarathustra

Thus Spake Zarathustra
Translated by Thomas Common

by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 1999-01-01
  • Pages : 310
  • ISBN : 0543947343
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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This Elibron Classics title is a reprint of the original edition published by Boni and Liveright Publishers in New York, 1921.

Thus Spake Zarathustra Illustrated

Thus Spake Zarathustra Illustrated
A Book

by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 2020-11-09
  • Pages : 436
  • ISBN : 9876543210XXX
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Thus Spoke Zarathustra: A Book for All and None (German: Also sprach Zarathustra: Ein Buch für Alle und Keinen, also translated as Thus Spake Zarathustra) is a philosophical novel by German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, composed in four parts written and published between 1883 and 1885. As one of the most influential works in modern nihilism, the book follows the life, speeches, and travels of Zarathustra, the originator of Zoroastrianism. Much of the work deals with ideas such as the "eternal recurrence of the same," the parable on the "death of God," and the "prophecy" of the Übermensch, which were first introduced in The Gay Science. Nietzsche himself considered Zarathustra to be his magnum opus. Thus Spoke Zarathustra argues man should seek to perfect himself during his life on earth, surpassing societal standards of morality and goodness. The ideal is - man transforming himself into the "Übermensch," a more evolved, superhuman-like state of being.

Thus Spake Zarathustra

Thus Spake Zarathustra
A Book for All and None

by Friedrich Nietzsche

  • Publisher : Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
  • Release : 2018-07-07
  • Pages : 268
  • ISBN : 9781722382674
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Thus Spake Zarathustra: A Book for All and None, A Philosophical Novel by Friedrich Nietzsche and translated by Thomas Common. Thus Spoke Zarathustra: A Book for All and None (German: Also sprach Zarathustra: Ein Buch uür Alle und Keinen, also translated as Thus Spake Zarathustra) is a philosophical novel by German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, composed in four parts between 1883 and 1885 and published between 1883 and 1891. Much of the work deals with ideas such as the "eternal recurrence of the same," the parable on the "death of God," and the "prophecy" of the Ubermensch, which were first introduced in The Gay Science. "Zarathustra" is my brother's most personal work; it is the history of his most individual experiences, of his friendships, ideals, raptures, bitterest disappointments and sorrows. Above it all, however, there soars, transfiguring it, the image of his greatest hopes and remotest aims. My brother had the figure of Zarathustra in his mind from his very earliest youth: he once told me that even as a child he had dreamt of him. At different periods in his life, he would call this haunter of his dreams by different names; "but in the end," he declares in a note on the subject, "I had to do a Persian the honour of identifying him with this creature of my fancy. Persians were the first to take a broad and comprehensive view of history. Every series of evolutions, according to them, was presided over by a prophet; and every prophet had his 'Hazar, '- his dynasty of a thousand years."

Thus Spake Zarathustra

Thus Spake Zarathustra
A Book for All and None

by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

  • Publisher : The Floating Press
  • Release : 2009-01-01
  • Pages : 648
  • ISBN : 1877527858
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Thus Spake Zarathustra is an important philosophical text by German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. In it he begins his exploration of morality, questioning the assumption of Christianity or Judaism as a basis for morality. He wrote about the "death of God" and the "Übermensch" (superhuman) who would have supreme morality. Ironically, Nietzsche mimics the style of the Bible, fictionalizing Zarathustra as his protagonist.

Thus Spake Zarathustra (查拉圖斯特拉如是說)

Thus Spake Zarathustra (查拉圖斯特拉如是說)
A Book

by Friedrich Nietzsche

  • Publisher : Hyweb Technology Co. Ltd.
  • Release : 2011-03-15
  • Pages : 200
  • ISBN : 9876543210XXX
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The origiinal text of Thus Spoke Zarathustra by Friedrich Noetzsche

Thus Spake Zarathustra

Thus Spake Zarathustra
Large Print

by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 2019-06-13
  • Pages : 352
  • ISBN : 9781073346196
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Thus Spoke Zarathustra (German: Also sprach Zarathustra, sometimes translated Thus Spake Zarathustra), subtitled A Book for All and None (Ein Buch für Alle und Keinen), is a written work by German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, composed in four parts between 1883 and 1885. Much of the work deals with ideas such as the "eternal recurrence of the same", the parable on the "death of God", and the "prophecy" of the Overman, which were first introduced in The Gay Science.

The Eternal Recurrence ; and Explanatory Notes to "Thus Spake Zarathustra"

The Eternal Recurrence ; and Explanatory Notes to 'Thus Spake Zarathustra'
A Book

by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

  • Publisher : Unknown Publisher
  • Release : 1911
  • Pages : 281
  • ISBN : 9876543210XXX
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Thus Spake Zarathustra

Thus Spake Zarathustra
A Book

by Friedrich Nietzche

  • Publisher : Xist Publishing
  • Release : 2016-03-17
  • Pages : 439
  • ISBN : 1681950510
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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God Is Dead“I am a forest, and a night of dark trees: but he who is not afraid of my darkness, will find banks full of roses under my cypresses.” - Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spake Zarathustra Zarathustra in Thus Spake Zarathustra is not the Persian founder of Zoroastrianism, he is just a means to Friedrich Nietzsche’s end. Through Zarathustra, Nietzsche tries to define his own philosophy attacking the Christian values of good and evil and predicting the rise of a new man, the superman, a self-mastered, self-cultivating, self-directed and self-overcoming individual.

Thus Spake Zarathustra

Thus Spake Zarathustra
A Book

by Friedrich Nietzsche

  • Publisher : Standard Ebooks
  • Release : 2021-07-10T18:44:38Z
  • Pages : 129
  • ISBN : 9876543210XXX
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Thus Spake Zarathustra was Friedrich Nietzsche’s favorite of the books he wrote, and has been his most popular amongst general readers. Yet some scholars dislike it because of its unphilosophical nature: it eschews jargon and the scaffolding of arguments, which engage only the intellect, in favor of an artistic approach that engages the whole mind. After ten years of solitude in a cave high in the mountains, Zarathustra wishes to share with humanity the wisdom he has accumulated during this time. He reaches the nearest town and addresses the crowd on the marketplace. He tells them of the Overman: the next step in human evolution, a being who creates their own values, freed from the weight of tradition and morality, and who takes responsibility for their own successes and failures. But the crowd doesn’t understand him; his discourse is met only with rude ignorance. Zarathustra then decides to gather a small group of disciples and share his wisdom with them. The bulk of the book is Zarathustra’s speeches on topics such as morality, society, individualism, religion, and how suffering and its overcoming are what give meaning to our existence. While already wiser than most, Zarathustra still learns from those he talks to, re-evaluating his thoughts as he deals with disappointment (such as when his disciples prove to be mere followers), and confronting his own doubts. His greatest challenge, though, comes when he faces the existential test of the eternal recurrence of the same: the thought that our lives could repeat indefinitely without the minutest of change. The inspiration for Zarathustra came to Nietzsche during one of the long hikes he often indulged in despite his failing health. It was a decade of solitude: his physical condition had worsened to the point of forcing him to retire from his position at the University of Basel, and each change of season prompted him to relocate to kinder climes in Switzerland, France, or Italy. The book took two years to write. Each of its four parts was written in a ten-day period of creative effervescence followed by months of gloom, plagued by terrible, debilitating migraines. Zarathustra was initially received with indifference at best and frustration at worst. It’s a work of philosophy as much as aesthetics: the language is modeled after the Luther Bible and contains numerous references to Homer, Heraclitus, Plato, Goethe, Emerson, and Wagner, to name a few. Later Nietzsche attempted to address the book’s lack of popularity by framing the same concepts in a more traditional, approachable manner in his following book, Beyond Good and Evil, but that book also struggled to find an audience. With his health steadily deteriorating, Nietzsche’s mind broke down in 1889 and never recovered. His body would live on for 11 more years, and he ended up in the care of his sister, Elisabeth. A stalwart nationalist and anti-Semite, she saw in her brother’s illness the opportunity to turn him into a German hero. Despite her brother’s firm opposition to nationalism, anti-Semitism, and power politics, she perverted his work by promoting it for her own ends. Scores of commentators partook in her lie and enthusiastically used Nietzsche’s work to buttress their own contrary views. Doing so requires one to selectively ignore half the content of the book: Zarathustra’s discourses regularly touch on a priori dark and violent themes, but they also clearly state that these are to be directed towards oneself. Reaching the Overman requires us to know ourselves, and such introspection, given the darker side of human nature, leads to contempt. This contempt for ourselves, says Nietzsche, should be embraced as the first step towards awareness of what we could be. Cruelty, likewise, stems from that knowledge as a necessity to hammer ourselves into the proper shape. Such commentators also conveniently ignored Zarathustra’s many remarks about love: love for ourselves, he says, is what can prevent us from spreading resentment around us during this difficult process of change. The first English translation of Zarathustra was by Alexander Tille, a German scholar who had emigrated to Scotland. English wasn’t his first language and his work suffered from it. Thomas Common, a Scottish scholar, used Tille’s work as the base for his own translation. Bringing Zarathustra to the English-speaking world was no easy task given Nietzsche’s stylistic idiosyncrasies. Just like Nietzsche, Common took risks: because the book is written in the style of the Luther Bible, Common decided to emulate the style of the King James Bible; he also tried to reproduce the musicality of the language and the new words coined by Nietzsche, some of which have been updated over time—e.g. Common’s “Superman” is nowadays known as “Overman.” While his choices have been controversial, he produced a landmark translation that faithfully tried to convert the unique flavor of Zarathustra into English. Published in 1909, it would take four decades until the next translation by Walter Kaufman in 1954. But Zarathustra didn’t find its scholarly fame limited to Europe: soon after its publication, it reached Asia, where it was received with enthusiasm, particularly in China and Japan where it influenced the famous Kyoto School. Zarathustra has also received special attention from the music world. Nietzsche loved music and poetry, and it was his wish that this book be taken as music. No fewer than 87 pieces have been inspired by the book, in part or as a whole. The best known are Richard Strauss’ Also Sprach Zarathustra, the fourth movement of Gustav Mahler’s Symphony No. 3, and Frederick Delius’ A Mass of Life. This book is part of the Standard Ebooks project, which produces free public domain ebooks.

World Classics Library: Nietzsche

World Classics Library: Nietzsche
Thus Spake Zarathustra, Ecce Homo, Beyond Good and Evil

by Frederich Nietzsche

  • Publisher : Arcturus World Classics Librar
  • Release : 2020-11
  • Pages : 736
  • ISBN : 9781839407000
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Could it be possible? This old saint in the forest hath not yet heard of it, that God is dead! - Nietzsche, Thus Spake Zarathustra German philosopher Friedrich Niezsche was one of the most important thinkers of the 19th century. His work contains a radical critique of objective truth, arguing instead that reality is forged entirely by our perspective. This opinion led him to reject Christian morality and confront how nihilism has become an inherent predicament of the modern world. This beautiful hardback collection brings together three of Nietzsche's central writings, Thus Spake Zarathustra, Ecce Homo and Beyond Good and Evil. These radical and influential works have profoundly shaped modern philosophy and his ideas remain as pertinent now as they ever were. ABOUT THE SERIES: The World Classics Library series gathers together the work of authors and philosophers whose ideas have stood the test of time. Perfect for bibliophiles, these gorgeous jacketed hardbacks are a wonderful addition to any bookshelf.